Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Adult Stem Cells

  • Rikke Christensen
  • Nedime Serakinci
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_125-2

Synonyms

Definition

An undifferentiated cell found in a differentiated tissue that can renew itself and (with certain limitations) differentiate to yield all the specialized cell types of the tissue from which it originated.

Characteristics

Adult stem cellsare defined as undifferentiated tissue-specific stem cells with extensive self-renewal capacity, which can proliferate to generate mature cells of the tissue of origin. The primary roles of adult stem cells are to maintain and/or regenerate the cells of damaged tissues. Stem cells may remain quiescent for long periods of time until they are activated by a need for more cells. Adult stem cells were first described in organs and tissues characterized by high cell turnover, such as blood, gut, testis, and skin, but have to date also been isolated from many other organs and tissues including brain, bone marrow, liver, heart, lung, retina, ovarian epithelium, teeth, mammary...

Keywords

Stem Cell Embryonic Stem Cell Cancer Stem Cell Adult Stem Cell Stem Cell Niche 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disease. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3395. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5270Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Somatic Cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3466. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5408Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Totipotent Stem Cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3730. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5866Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Transdifferentiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3753. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5909Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Unipotent Stem Cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3846. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6109Google Scholar
  6. (2012) EGFR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1828Google Scholar
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  8. (2012) Hemoglobinopathy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1647. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2633Google Scholar
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  10. (2012) Immortalized cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1812. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2971Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Microenvironment. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2296. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3720Google Scholar
  12. (2012) MSC. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2383. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3859Google Scholar
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  14. (2012) Multipotent stem cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2404. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3903Google Scholar
  15. (2012) Pluripotent stem cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2930. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4639Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Clinical GeneticsAarhus University HospitalAarhusDenmark
  2. 2.Medical GeneticsNear East UniversityNicosiaNorthern Cyprus