Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Chemoattraction

  • Jose Luis Rodríguez-Fernández
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1064-2

Synonyms

Definition

Chemoattraction is the process whereby a cell detects a chemical gradient of a ligand called chemoattractant and, as a consequence, gets oriented and subsequently moves in the direction from a low to a high concentration of the chemoattractant. Chemoattraction is controlled by specific chemoattractant receptors that are able to detect selectively these ligands. Chemoattraction is called chemotaxis or haptotaxis when the chemical gradient of the chemoattractant is presented to the cell either in a soluble or bound to a substrate form, respectively. As it is not clear which one of these two types of motile processes takes place in vivo, it is more appropriate to refer to these directional motile processes with the more general term of chemoattraction.

Characteristics

Chemoattractants use specific chemoattractant receptors to guide different migratory cell types toward specific sites in the organism. These receptors, upon binding...

Keywords

Cancer Cell Chemokine Receptor Metastatic Cell Protease Secretion Premetastatic Niche 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Chemotaxis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 793. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1081Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Glioma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1557. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2423Google Scholar
  3. (2012) G-protein Couple Receptor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1587. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2294Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Haptotaxis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1631. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2565Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Integrin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1884. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3084Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Orthotopic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2661. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4264Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Xenograft. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3967. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6278Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de Microbiología Molecular y Biología de las InfeccionesCentro de Investigaciones BiológicasMadridSpain