Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Adipose Tumors

  • Florence Pedeutour
  • Antoine Italiano
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_106-2

Synonyms

Definition

Adipose tumors (AT) are mesenchymal neoplasms that form the largest group of human tumors. They include benign tumors, such as the very common lipomas, as well as rare malignant tumors with various degrees of clinical aggressiveness. Histologically, AT consist of adipocytic cells showing different levels of differentiation, from mature adipocytes in benign lipomas up to undifferentiated lipoblastic cells in high-grade liposarcomas. The 2002 World Health Organization classification distinguishes seven entities of benign AT: lipoma, lipoblastoma/lipoblastomatosis, angiolipoma, myolipoma of soft tissue, chondroid lipoma, spindle cell/pleomorphic lipoma, and hibernoma. Malignant AT, also called liposarcomas, include three types: well-differentiated liposarcoma/dedifferentiated liposarcoma, myxoid/round cell liposarcoma, and pleomorphic liposarcoma. Except for the ordinary superficial lipomas, differential...

Keywords

Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Mature Adipocyte Myxoid Liposarcoma Supernumerary Chromosome Spindle Cell Lipoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Fletcher C, Unni K, Mertens F (eds) (2002) World Health Organization classification of tumours pathology and genetics of tumours of soft tissue and bone. IARC Press, LyonGoogle Scholar
  2. Sandberg AA (2004a) Updates on the cytogenetics and molecular genetics of bone and soft tissue tumors: liposarcoma. Cancer Genet Cytogenet 155:1–24CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Sandberg AA (2004b) Updates on the cytogenetics and molecular genetics of bone and soft tissue tumors: lipoma. Cancer Genet Cytogenet 150:93–115CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Chromosome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 848. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1145Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Dedifferentiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1072. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1547Google Scholar
  3. (2012) High Content Screen. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1694. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2721Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Lipoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2056. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3379Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Neocentromere. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2473. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4009Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Point Mutation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2934. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4653Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Solid Tumors Genetics, Faculty of MedicineNice University HospitalNiceFrance
  2. 2.Early Phase Trials and Sarcoma UnitsInstitut BergonieBordeauxFrance