Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Chelators as Anti-Cancer Drugs

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1053-3

Synonyms

Definition

Iron is an element fundamental for life. Many vital cellular processes such as energy metabolism and DNA synthesis consist of reactions that require catalysis by iron-containing proteins. These proteins include cytochromes, and ribonucleotide reductase (RR). The latter is more significant in the context of cellular proliferation due to its role in catalyzing the rate-limiting step of DNA synthesis. Ultimately, the importance of iron is highlighted by the fact that iron-deprivation leads to G1/S cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Cancer cells, in particular, have a higher iron requirement because of their rapid rate of proliferation. In order to satisfy their iron requirement, some cancer cells have altered iron metabolism. In addition, iron chelators also demonstrate the ability to inhibit growth of aggressive tumors such as neuroblastoma. For these reasons, iron-deprivation through iron chelation is seen as an exploitable therapeutic strategy for...

Keywords

Iron Chelation Serum Ferritin Level Ribonucleotide Reductase Cellular Iron Toxic Free Radical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Cell cycle. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 737. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_994Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cytochrome c . In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1043. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1458Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Drg-1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1160. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1730Google Scholar
  4. (2012) E2F transcription factor . In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1183. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1770Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Lipophilicity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2058. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3384Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Ribonucleotide reductase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3308. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5102Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Chelator. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 755. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1052Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Phosphorylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2870. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4544Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia