Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Adiponectin

  • Jie Chen
  • Janice B. B. Lam
  • Yu Wang
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_103-3

Synonyms

Definition

Adiponectin is a major adipokine secreted exclusively from adipocytes. This adipokine possesses insulin-sensitizing, antidiabetic, antiangiogenic, antiatherogenic, antiinflammatory and antitumorigenic properties.

Characteristics

Adiponectin was originally identified as an adipose-specific gene dysregulated in obesity. Human adiponectin gene is located on chromosome 3q27 and encodes a 244 amino acids polypeptide comprising of an NH 2-terminal secretory signal sequence, followed by a hypervariable region, a collagenous domain, and a COOH-terminal globular domain (Fig. 1a). Circulating concentrations of adiponectin range from 3 to 30 μg/ml and account for about 0.05 % of total human blood proteins. Despite the fact that it is produced in adipose tissue, serum concentrations...

Keywords

Pancreatic Cancer Renal Cell Carcinoma Endometrial Cancer Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Adiponectin Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and PharmacyThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina