Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

Living Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Pastoral Counseling: Two-Thirds World Perspectives

  • Esther Acolatse
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_6806-1

Introduction

If pastoral counseling, as the literature points out, is the “healing, sustaining, guiding/shepherding and reconciling” (Clinebell 1966, 1984) undertaken by professionals who use spiritual resources as well as psychological understanding for healing and growth, then pastoral counseling in the so-called Third World – currently an anomalous phrase – can be seen as dating back to the work of traditional diviners/healers/priests within these contexts. The history of formal pastoral counseling practice and its coupling with academic discipline in most Third World contexts or Majority World (a much more politically correct designation), however, dates for most countries, to encounters with Western missionary influence and most recently a postcolonial/postindependence phenomena largely after the 1960s.

Most of these more modern pastoral counseling approaches take Western psychological theories and practices as their point of departure in as much as current practices are provided...

Keywords

Religious Identity Pastoral Care Counseling Practice Pastoral Counseling Pastoral Theology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Duke Divinity SchoolDurhamUSA