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Mindfulness, Practical Applications

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What Is Mindfulness and Its Origin

Mindfulness is a contemplative practice originating from the Budhist spiritual practice of insight meditation or vipassana bhavana, in its original Pali language (Oosterwijk et al. 2012). The contemplative Buddhist principles, nowadays known as mindfulness practices, appeared 2,500 years ago in the texts of the Satipatthana and Anapanasati Sutras. This, otherwise spiritual practice, has been adopted as a secular practice in the fields of medicine, mental health, and well-being (Plante 2010). The secular application of mindfulness is utilized as a way to step out of unconscious living by bringing moment by moment attention, to all cognitive, affective, and sensory experiences (Kabat-Zinn 1990). In addition, mindfulness in its spiritual roots and its secular practices involves nonjudgmental and curious attitude (Kabat-Zinn 2003) and a “way of life that reveals the gentle and loving wholeness that lies in the heart of being” (Borysenko in Kabat-Zinn 2003)....

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Correspondence to Monica Mansilla .

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Mansilla, M. (2019). Mindfulness, Practical Applications. In: Leeming, D. (eds) Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_200125-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_200125-1

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