Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

Living Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Slavoj Žižek and Religion

  • Dan Mills
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27771-9_200121-1

Slovenian Marxist-Lacanian philosopher Slavoj Žižek’s parents were both atheists, and Žižek witnessed firsthand the bloody aftermath of the failed Soviet-backed Yugoslavian government. As an atheist, Žižek holds a unique place in contemporary Christian theological discourse. Instead of ignoring, downplaying, or demeaning theological strands of intellectual history, Žižek instead engages them head on with the same intellectual and philosophical rigor with which he engages continental philosophy, Marxism, and Lacanian psychoanalysis. Žižek’s take on religion and theology therefore presents another way in which he challenges expectations and, more importantly, demonstrates the relevance of religious discourse in an era during which the divide between the religious and the nonreligious has only grown greater.

Beginning with his first major work, The Sublime Object of Ideology(1989), Žižek has extensively critiqued religion, specifically Christianity, leading up to the publication of...

Keywords

Intellectual History Continental Philosophy True Religion Religious Choice Strange Beast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

Bibliography

  1. Davis, C., Milbank, J., & Žižek, S. (Eds.). (2005). Theology and the political: The new debate. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Kotsko, A. (2008). Žižek and theology. London: T&T Clark.Google Scholar
  3. Lacan, J. (1991). The seminar of Jacques Lacan: Book II: The ego in Freud’s theory and in the technique of psychoanalysis, 1954–1955 (trans: Tomaselli, S.). New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  4. Lacan, J. (2013). The triumph of religion (trans: Fink, B.). Cambridge, UK/Malden, MA: Polity.Google Scholar
  5. Parker, I. (2004). Slavoj Zizek: A critical introduction. London/Sterling: Pluto Press.Google Scholar
  6. Žižek, S. (2000). The fragile absolute, or, why is the christian legacy worth fighting for? London/New York: Verso.Google Scholar
  7. Žižek, S. (2001). On belief. London/New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  8. Žižek, S. (2003). The puppet and the dwarf: The perverse core of christianity. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  9. Žižek, S. (2005). The “thrilling romance of orthodoxy”. In C. Davis, J. Milbank, & S. Žižek (Eds.), Theology and the political: The new debate (pp. 52–71). Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Žižek, S. (2009a). Dialectical clarity versus the misty conceit of paradox. In C. Davis (Ed.), The monstrosity of christ: Paradox or dialectic? (pp. 234–306). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  11. Žižek, S. (2009b). The fear of four words: A modest plea for the hegelian reading of christianity. In C. Davis (Ed.), The monstrosity of christ: Paradox or dialectic? (pp. 24–109). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  12. Žižek, S. (2010a). A meditation on michelangelo’s christ on the cross. In Paul’s new moment: Continental philosophy and the future of christian theology (pp. 169–184). Grand Rapids: Brazos.Google Scholar
  13. Žižek, S. (2010b). Paul and the truth event. In Paul’s new moment: Continental philosophy and the future of christian theology (pp. 74–99). Grand Rapids: Brazos.Google Scholar
  14. Žižek, S. (2010c). Thinking backward: Predestination and apocalypse. In Paul’s new moment: Continental philosophy and the future of christian theology (pp. 185–210). Grand Rapids: Brazos.Google Scholar
  15. Žižek, S. (2012a). A glance into the archives of islam. In God in pain: Inversions of apocalypse (pp. 103–126). New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar
  16. Žižek, S. (2012b). Christianity against the sacred. In God in pain: Inversions of apocalypse (pp. 43–71). New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar
  17. Žižek, S. (2012c). Introduction: For a theologico-political suspension of the ethical. In God in pain: Inversions of apocalypse (pp. 7–41). New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar
  18. Žižek, S. (2012d). Only a suffering god can save us. In God in pain: Inversions of apocalypse (pp. 155–192). New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar
  19. Žižek, S. (2012e). The animal gaze of the other. In God in pain: Inversions of apocalypse (pp. 221–240). New York: Seven Stories Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GeorgiaAthensUSA