Nonbehavioral Methods Used in the Study of Learning and Memory

Living reference work entry

Abstract

The purpose of this assay is to screen drugs for inhibition of acetylcholine-esterase activity. Inhibitors of this enzyme may be useful for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Keywords

Nerve Growth Factor Muscarinic Receptor Acetylcholinesterase Activity Muscarinic Agonist Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

In Vitro Inhibition of Acetylcholine-Esterase Activity in Rat Striatum

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In Vitro Inhibition of Butyrylcholine-Esterase Activity in Human Serum

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Ex Vivo Cholinesterase Inhibition

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Molecular Forms of Acetylcholinesterase from Rat Frontal Cortex and Striatum

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Release of [3H]ACh and Other Transmitters from Rat Brain Slices

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[3H]Oxotremorine-M Binding to Muscarinic Cholinergic Receptors in Rat Forebrain

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[3H]N-Methylscopolamine Binding in the Presence and Absence of Gpp(NH) p

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Stimulation of Phosphatidylinositol Turnover in Rat Brain Slices

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[3H]N-Methylcarbamylcholine Binding to Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptors in Rat Frontal Cortex

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Uncompetitive NMDA Receptor Antagonism

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Secretion of Nerve Growth Factor by Cultured Neurons/Astroglial Cells

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Inhibition of Respiratory Burst in Microglial Cells/Macrophages

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Frederic and Mary Wolfe Center, Pharmacology Department, MS-1015The University of Toledo, HSCToledoUSA

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