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Assessment of Renal Function

  • Susan Emeigh Hart
Living reference work entry

Abstract

In the different parts of the kidney (proximal tubules, distal tubules, collecting ducts), fluid is reabsorbed and substances may be transported either from the tubule lumen to the blood side (reabsorption) or vice versa (secretion). Besides active transport and coupled transport systems, ion channels play an important role in the function of kidney cells. The various modes of the patch clamp technique (cell-attached, cell-excised, whole-cell mode) (Neher and Sakmann 1976; Hamill et al. 1981) allow the investigation of ion channels. In addition, the investigation of other electrogenic transport mechanisms, such as the sodium-coupled alanine transport, can be studied.

Keywords

Glomerular Filtration Rate Proximal Tubule Fractional Excretion Renal Blood Flow Distal Tubule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

Patch Clamp Technique in Kidney Cells

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Clearance Methods

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Assessment of GFR by Plasma Chemistry

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Assessment of RBF by Intravascular Doppler Flow Probes

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Assessment of GFR and RBF by Scintigraphic Imaging

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Urinalysis

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Fractional Excretion Methods

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Assessment of Medullary Osmolarity and Blood Flow

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Micropuncture Techniques in the Rat

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Stop-Flow Technique

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Non-Clinical Drug SafetyBoehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, IncRidgefieldUSA

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