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Assays for the Expression and Release of Insulin and Glucose-Regulating Peptide Hormones from Pancreatic β-Cell

  • Günter Müller
Living reference work entry

Abstract

The in vitro perfusion of the isolated rat pancreas as described by Anderson and Long (1947), Ross (1972), Grodsky and coworkers (1983, 1984), and Muñoz and coworkers (1995) offers the advantage to study the influence of carbohydrates, hormones, and drugs such as sulfonylureas not only on insulin but also on glucagon and somatostatin secretion without interference of secondary effects resulting from changes in hepatic, pituitary, or adrenal functions.

Keywords

Insulin Secretion KATP Channel INS1 Cell RINm5F Cell Photoaffinity Label 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References and Further Reading

Insulin Release from the Isolated Perfused Rat Pancreas; Insulin Release from the Isolated Perifused Rat Pancreatic Islets

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Insulin Release from Cultured β-Cells; Lipolysis in β-Cell

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Measurement of Ca2+ Levels; Measurement of 86Rb+ Efflux

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Measurement of Cell Membrane Potential; Measurement of Cytosolic ATP Levels; Analysis of Lipotoxicity

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Interaction with β-Cell Plasma Membranes and KATP Channels

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Helmholtz Center Munich, Helmholtz Diabetes CenterInstitute for Diabetes and ObesityMunichGermany

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