CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2014 Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart

Cermets

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-20617-7_6690

Synonyms

Definition

A cermet is a composite material composed of ceramic particles including titanium carbide (TiC), titanium nitride (TiN), and titanium carbonitride (TiCN) bonded with metal. The name “cermet” combines the words ceramic (cer) and metal (met). They are most successfully used for finishing and light roughing applications.

Theory and Application

History

During the 1950s, cutting tool manufacturers began to develop a new TiC/nickel alloy cermet that contained molybdenum and carbon. Although the cutting tool material was able to perform well at high speed and high temperature, the lack of toughness restricted the applications to light finishing cuts with light feed rate. In addition, machinists inevitably compared the cermet tools to the tougher tungsten-carbide tools that were available then, and they saw that tungsten carbide performs satisfactorily for use in rough cutting or interrupted cutting...

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References

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Copyright information

© CIRP 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of EngineeringOsaka UniversityOsakaJapan