CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2014 Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart

Inspection (Precision Engineering and Metrology)

  • Guido Tosello
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-20617-7_6585

Definition

In the field of Precision Engineering and Metrology, inspection can be defined as the set of hardware, software, procedures, and activities that can provide measurements of geometric characteristics of physical manufactured products.

Such geometric characteristics can refer to absolute dimensions (e.g., diameter) and form (e.g., free-form surfaces), to tolerances of dimensions and form (e.g., flatness), as well as surface parameters (e.g., average surface  roughness).

Theory and Application

The main goal of inspection is to ensure the functionality of workpieces, products, and testing devices and thus ensuring economical value of products. As such, the main objective of inspection in the field of Precision Engineering and  Metrology is to quantify the dimensional characteristics of components by means of measurements and to compare the results of those measurements with the product specifications (ISO 8015 2011).

Inspectionis today very closely connected into the...

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References

  1. ISO 1101 (2004) Geometrical product specifications (GPS): geometrical tolerancing: tolerances of form, orientation, location and run-out. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  2. ISO 14253–1 (1998) Geometrical product specifications (GPS): inspection by measurement of workpieces and measuring equipment, part 1: decision rules for proving conformance or non-conformance with specifications. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  3. ISO 14253–2 (2011) Geometrical product specifications (GPS): inspection by measurement of workpieces and measuring equipment, part 2: guidance for the estimation of uncertainty in GPS measurement, in calibration of measuring equipment and in product verification. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  4. ISO 4287 (1997) Geometrical product specifications (GPS): surface texture: profile method: terms, definitions and surface texture parameters. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  5. ISO 8015 (2011) Geometrical product specifications (GPS): fundamentals: concepts, principles and rules. International Organization for Standardization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  6. JCGM 100 (2008) Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM). Joint Committee for Guides in Metrology, pp i–viii, 1–132, BIPM (Bureau International des Poids et Mesures), Sèvres (France)Google Scholar
  7. Knapp W (2001) Tolerance and uncertainty. 5th international conference on laser metrology, machine tool, CMM and robot performance, LAMDAMP 2001, pp 357–366Google Scholar
  8. Weckenmann A, Rinnagl M (2000) Acceptance of processes: do we need decision rules? Precis Eng 24(3):264–269CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© CIRP 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringTechnical University of DenmarkKgs. LyngbyDenmark