CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2014 Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart

Additive Manufacturing Technologies

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-20617-7_6492

Synonyms

Definition

Rapid Prototyping is the construction of complex three-dimensional parts using additive manufacturing technology.

Theory and Application

Introduction

Additive Manufacturing Technologies (AMT) are capable of building complex 3D objects by stacking up thin individual layers. By using this additive approach the degree of freedom regarding shape complexity is greatly enhanced compared to subtractive processes like turning or machining. AMT is largely used for manufacturing short-term prototypes (Rapid Prototyping), but it is also used for small-scale series production (Rapid Manufacturing) and tooling applications (Rapid Tooling). Besides applications in engineering, RP is becoming more and more popular in medical applications, where patient-specific geometries are required (e.g., orthopedics, dentistry, and hearing aids).

In order to achieve a good surface quality, thin layers are...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Bartolo PJ (2011) Stereolithography, 1st edn. Springer, New York. ISBN: 978-0-387-92903-3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cooper KG (2001) Rapid prototyping technology: selection and application, 1st edn. Marcel Dekker Inc., New York. ISBN: 0-8247-0261-1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Gebhardt A (2008) Generative Fertigungsverfahren [Additive Manufacturing Technologies], 3rd edn. Carl Hanser, Munich, Germany. ISBN: 978-3-446-22666-1Google Scholar
  4. Neumeister A, Overmeyer L, Kracht D (2012) Direct precision manufacturing using organically modified ceramics. Berichte aus dem LZH, PZH Produktionstechnisches Zentrum, No. 1, Hannover, Germany, pp 126–132. ISBN: 978-3-943104-48-6Google Scholar
  5. Lam CXF, Mo XM, Teoh SH, Hutmacher DW (2002) Scaffold development using 3D printing with a starch-based polymer. Materials Science and Engineering C 20:49–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Liska R, Stampfl J (2010) Photopolymers for rapid prototyping. In Fouassier JP, Allonas X (ed) Basics and applications of photopolymerization reactions. Research Signpost, Kerala, India, pp 147–173Google Scholar

Copyright information

© CIRP 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Material Science and TechnologyVienna University of TechnologyViennaAustria