CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2014 Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart

Grinding

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-20617-7_6427

Definition

Grinding is defined as machining, using tools with a large number of geometrically undefined cutting edges with mostly negative rake angles, which are composed of natural or synthetic abrasive material retained by a bonding material. The chip formation is characterized by a noncontinuous contact and a high relative velocity between the abrasive grains and the workpiece.

Theory and Application

Introduction

Grinding is a manufacturing process that belongs to the group of material removal processes. Material removal processes can be subdivided into the groups of cutting processes and abrasive processes. Grinding differs from other abrasive processes such as honing, lapping, polishing, and blasting by the tools that are used, the depth of cut, and the kinematics during chip formation. The tools that are used for grinding are grinding wheels, pins, and belts, where the abrasive grains are retained in a bonding material. The main advantages of grinding are:
  • The good machinability...

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References

  1. CIRP Dictionary of production engineering (2004) Manufacturing systems, vol 2, 1st edn. Springer, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  2. DIN 8589–11 Standard (2003) Fertigungsverfahren Spanen. Teil 11: Schleifen mit rotierenden Werkzeugen; Einordnung, Unterteilung, Begriffe [Manufacturing processes chip removal – Part 11: grinding with rotating tools. Classification, subdivision, terms and definitions]. Beuth, Berlin (in German)Google Scholar
  3. Kirsch B, Herzenstiel P, Aurich JC (2010) Experimental results using a grinding wheel with an internal cooling lubricant supply. In: Aoyama T, Takeuchi Y (eds) Proceedings of the 4th CIRP international conference on high performance cutting, 24–26 Oct 2010, Gifu, Japan, vol 1, pp 443–448Google Scholar
  4. Marinescu ID, Hitchiner M, Uhlmann E, Rowe WB, Inasaki I (2007) Handbook of machining with grinding wheels. CRC, Boca RatonGoogle Scholar
  5. VDI 3397 Part 1 Standard (2007) Metalworking fluids. VDI, DüsseldorfGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© CIRP 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Manufacturing Technology and Production SystemsUniversity of KaiserlauternKaiserlauternGermany