CIRP Encyclopedia of Production Engineering

2014 Edition
| Editors: The International Academy for Production Engineering, Luc Laperrière, Gunther Reinhart

Turning with Rotary Tools

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-20617-7_16678

Synonyms

Definition

Turning with a rotary tool is expected to improve the tool life and productivity in machining difficult-to-machine materials. A circular cutting tool is used, and it rotates around its axis. Compared to a conventional cutting tool, the rotary tool allows each portion of the cutting edge to be cooled between engagements and makes use of the entire circumference of the edge.

Theory and Application

Turning with Rotary Tools

Introduction

Turning with a rotary tool is expected to improve the tool life and productivity in machining difficult-to-machine materials such as nickel-based super alloy, titanium alloy, and metal-matrix composites. Compared to a conventional cutting tool, the rotary tool allows each portion of the cutting edge to be cooled between engagements and makes use of the entire circumference of the edge. However, the circular cutting tool undergoes a thermodynamic cycle characterized by intermittent heating and cooling,...

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References

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Copyright information

© CIRP 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Mechanical EngineeringKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan