Advertisement

1 Historical Overview of Paleoanthropological Research

  • Winfried Henke
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive scientific historical overview on paleoanthropology as a multifaceted biological discipline. A terse compendium on pre-Darwinian theories of evolution is followed by a historical report of the paradigmatic change by Darwin's perspective on life processes from a teleological to a teleonomic view. Focusing on the fossil discoveries in Europe and later on in Asia and Africa and the different methodological approaches, it becomes obvious that as opposed to other biological disciplines, paleoanthropology remained until post-World War II first and foremost a narrative discipline, apart from the mainstream of biological thinking. Paleoanthropology kept this “iridescent image” in the public opinion until now, wrongly, as is proven. It is shown that since Washburn brought up an innovative conceptual outline on physical anthropology in 1951, there arose a methodological change in the understanding of human evolution as a self-organizing process focusing on the structural and functional adaptations within the order Primates. The anthropological subdiscipline paleoanthropology profited tremendously from this new approach—albeit with some delay. Current paleoanthropological research does not only ask what our forerunners looked like and when, where, and how they evolved but also specifically seeks to explain the processes of radiation, diversification, and variability by concise hypothesis testing. We have to reconstruct the ecological niche of the fossil humans to define the determinants that caused adaptation in human evolution, a process sometimes defined as hominization, including our biogenetic and tradigenetic evolution.

Keywords

Human Evolution Human Origin Stone Tool Modern Synthesis Evolutionary Synthesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Abel O (1931) Die Stellung des Menschen im Rahmen der Wirbeltiere. Gustav Fischer Verlag, JenaGoogle Scholar
  2. Adam KD (1997) Ein Blick zurück – Bilder aus der Forschungsgeschichte. In: Wagner GA, Beinhauer KW (Hrsg.) Homo heidelbergensis von Mauer. Das Auftreten des Menschen in Europa. Heidelberger Verlagsanstalt, Heidelberg, pp 31–61Google Scholar
  3. Aiello L, Dean C (1990) An introduction to human evolutionary anatomy. Academic Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  4. Altner G (1981a) Einleitung. Darwinismus und Darwinismus. In: Altner G (Hrsg.) Der Darwinismus. Die Geschichte einer Theorie. Wiss. Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt, pp 1–4Google Scholar
  5. Altner G (Hrsg.) (1981b) Der Darwinismus. Die Geschichte einer Theorie. Wiss. Buchgesellschaft, DarmstadtGoogle Scholar
  6. Anapol F, German RZ, Jablonski NG (2004) Shaping primate evolution. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Andree C (1976) Rudolf Virchow als Prähistoriker. Band I-III, Böhlau-Verlag Köln, WienGoogle Scholar
  8. Andrews P, Franzen JL (eds) (1984) The early evolution of man—with special emphasis on Southeast Asia and Africa. Courier. Forsch.-Inst. Senckenberg 69, Frankfurt a. MGoogle Scholar
  9. Arsuaga J-L, Martínez I, Lorenzo C, Gracia A, Muñoz A, Alonso O, Galego J (1999) The human cranial remains from Gran Dolina Lower Pleistocene Site (Sierra de Atapuerca). J Hum Evol 37: 431–457PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ascenzi A, Biddittu I, Cassoli PF, Segre AG, Segre- Naldini E (2000) A calvarium of late Homo erectus from Ceprano, Italy. J Hum Evol 31: 409–423CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Beckmann K (1987) 1937–1987. 50 Jahre Neandertal-Museum. Ein Beitrag zur bewegten Geschichte des alten Neandertal-Museums. In: Neandertal-Museum (Gemeinde Erkrath) (Hrsg.) Neandertal-Fest vom 28.–31. Mai 1987, Festschrift, Heimatvereinigungen “Aule Mettmänner” und “Ercroder Jonges.” pp 99–115Google Scholar
  12. Bergner G (1965) Geschichte der menschlichen Phylogenetik seit dem 1900 Jahrhundert. In: Heberer G (Hrsg.) Menschliche Abstammungslehre. Fortschritte der Anthropogenie 1863–1964. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart, pp 20–55Google Scholar
  13. Bishop WW, Miller JA (eds) (1972) Calibration of hominoid evolution. Recent advances in isotopic and other dating methods applicable to the origin of man. Scottish Academic Press, EdinburghGoogle Scholar
  14. Bolk L (1926) Das Problem der Menschwerdung. G. Fischer-Verlag, JenaGoogle Scholar
  15. Boule M (1911–1913) L'homme fossile de la Chapelle-aux-Saints. Extrait Ann. Paléont. (1911): VI 111–172; (1912) VII: 21–192, 65–208; (1913) VIII: 1–70, 209–278Google Scholar
  16. Boule M (1921) Les Hommes Fossiles. Éléments de Paléontologie humaine. Première Edition, Masson et Cie, ParisGoogle Scholar
  17. Boule M (1923) Les Hommes Fossiles. Éléments de Paléontologie humaine. Deuxième Edition, Masson et Cie, ParisGoogle Scholar
  18. Boule M, Vallois H (1946) Les Hommes Fossiles. Éléments de Paléontologie humaine. Troisième Edition, Masson et Cie, ParisGoogle Scholar
  19. Boule M, Vallois H (1952) Les Hommes Fossiles. Éléments de Paléontologie humaine. Quatrième Edition, Masson et Cie, ParisGoogle Scholar
  20. Bowler JP (1986) Theories of human evolution: a century of debate 1844–1944. Blackwell, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  21. Bowler PJ (1976) Fossils and progress. Palaeontology and the idea of progressive evolution in the nineteenth century. Science History Publications, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  22. Bowler PJ (1988) The non-Darwinian revolution: reinterpreting a historical myth. Johns Hopkins University Press, BaltimoreGoogle Scholar
  23. Bowler PJ (1996) Life's splendid drama: evolutionary biology and the reconstruction of life's ancestry, 1840–1940. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  24. Bowler PJ (1997) Paleoanthropology theory. In: Spencer F (ed) History of physical anthropology, vol 2. Garland Publishunbg, Inc., New York and London, pp 785–790Google Scholar
  25. Bowler PJ (2001) Myths, narratives and the uses of history. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 9–20Google Scholar
  26. Bräuer G (1984) A craniological approach to the origin of anatomically modern Homo sapiens in Africa and implications for the appearance of modern Europeans. In: Smith FH, Spencer F (eds) The origin of modern humans: a world wide survey of the fossil evidence. Alan R. Liss, New York, pp 327–410Google Scholar
  27. Bräuer G, Smith FH (eds) (1992) Continuity or replacement. Controversies in Homo sapiens evolution. A.A. Balkema, RotterdamGoogle Scholar
  28. Bräuer G, Henke W, Schultz M (1995, ersch. 1997) Der hominide Unterkiefer von Dmanisi: Morphologie, Pathologie und Analysen zur Klassifikation. Jahrbuch des Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums Mainz 42: 183–203Google Scholar
  29. Bromage T, Schrenk F (eds) (1999) African biogeography, climate change, and human evolution. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  30. Brown P, Sutikna T, Morwood M, Soejono RP, Jatmiko, Wayhu Saptomo E, Rokus Awe Due, (2004) A new small-bodied hominin from the late Pleistocene of Flores, Indonesia. Nature 431: 1055–1061PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Brunet M, Guy F, Pilbeam D, Mackaye HT, Likius A, Ahounta Dj, Beauvilain A, Blondel C, Bocherens H, Boisserie J-R, De Bonis L, Coppens Y, Dejax J, Denys C, Duringer Ph, Eisenmann V, Fanone G, Fronty D, Geraads P, Lehmann T, Lihoreau F, Louchart A, Mahamat A, Merceron G, Mouchelin G, Otero O, Pelaez Campomanes P, Ponce De Leon M, Rage J-C, Sapanet M, Schuster M, Sudre J, Tassy P, Valentin X, Vignaud P, Viriot L, Zazzo A, Zollikofer C (2002) A hew hominid from the upper Miocene of Chad, central Africa. Nature 418: 145–151PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Cartmill M (1990) Human uniqueness and theoretical content in paleoanthropology. Int J Primatol 11: 173–192CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Cartmill M (1999) Revolution, evolution, and Kuhn, a response to Chamberlain and Hartwig. Evol Anthropol 8: 45–47CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Chamberlain JG, Hartwig WC (1999) Thomas Kuhn and paleoanthropology. Evol Anthropol 8: 42–44CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Chaoui NJ (2004) Mit Messzirkel und Schrotflinte. Basilisken-Presse. Marburg a. d. LahnGoogle Scholar
  36. Ciochon RL, Corrucccini RS (eds) (1983) New interpretations of ape and human ancestry. Plenum Press, New York and LondonGoogle Scholar
  37. Corbey R, Roebroeks W (2001a) Does disciplinary history matter? An introduction. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 1–8CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) (2001b) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, AmsterdamCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Cole SM (1975) Leakeys luck: the life of Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey, 1903–1972. Collins, LondonGoogle Scholar
  40. Daniel G (1959) The idea of man's antiquity. Sci Am 201: 167–176PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Daniel G (1975) One hundred and fifty years of archaeology. Duckworth, LondonGoogle Scholar
  42. Darwin C (1859) Origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life. John Murray, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Darwin C (1861) Origin of species by means of natural selection, or the preservation of favoured races in the struggle for life, 3rd edn. John Murray, LondonGoogle Scholar
  44. Darwin C (1863) Die Entstehung der Arten durch natürliche Zuchtwahl. (Übersetzt von Carl W. Neumann). Phillip Reclam Jun., Stuttgart (Erstveröffentlichung: “Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection,” 1859)Google Scholar
  45. Darwin C (1871) The descent of man and selection in relation to sex. John Murray and Sons, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Darwin C (1872) The expression of emotions in man and animals. John Murray London University of Chicago Press (1965), ChicagoCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Degen H (1968) Rudolf Virchow und die Entstehung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Anthropologie. Naturw. Rdsch. 21(H. 10): 407–414Google Scholar
  48. Delisle RG (1995) Human palaeontology and the evolutionary synthesis during the decade 1950–1960. In: Corbey R, Theunissen B (eds) Ape, man, apeman: changing views since 1600. Evaluative proceedings of the symposium ape, man, apeman: changing views since 1600, Leiden, the Netherlands, June 28–July 1, 1993. Department of Prehistory, Leiden University Leiden, pp 217–228Google Scholar
  49. Delisle RG (2001) Adaptationism versus cladism in human evolution studies. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 107–122Google Scholar
  50. Delson E (ed) (1985) Ancestors: the hard evidence. Alan R. Liss, Inc., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  51. Delson E, Tattersall I, Van Couvering JA, Brooks AS (eds) (2000) Encyclopedia of human evolution and prehistory. Garland Publishing. A member of the Tylor & Francis Group, New York and LondonGoogle Scholar
  52. Dennell RW (2001) From Sangiran to Olduvai, 1937–1960: The quest for ‘centres’ of hominid origins in Asia and Africa. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 145–166Google Scholar
  53. Dennett DC (1995) Darwin's dangerous idea. Evolution and the meaning of life. Simon & Schuster, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  54. Desmond A (1997) Huxley: from Devil's disciple to evolution's high priest. Addison-Wesley, Reading, MassGoogle Scholar
  55. Desmond A, Moore J (1991) Darwin. Michael Joseph Ltd., LondonGoogle Scholar
  56. Dickens P (2000) Social Darwinism: linking evolutionary thought to social theory. Open University Press, PhiladelphiaGoogle Scholar
  57. Dilthey W (1883) Einleitung in die Geisteswissenschaften. o.AGoogle Scholar
  58. Dobzhansky T (1937) Genetics and the origin of species. Columbia University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  59. Dobzhansky T (1944) On species and races of living and fossil man. Am J Phys Anthropol NS 2: 251–265CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Dobzhansky Th (1973) Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. Am Biol Teach 35: 125–129CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Drilling M (1992) Interdisziplinarität als Lernprozess. Von der Schwierigkeit eine gemeinsame Sprache zu finden. Unipress 91, Berichte über Forschung und Wissenschaft an der Universität Bern, herausgegeben von der Pressestelle. Bern, S48–S50Google Scholar
  62. Eggert MKH (1995) Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte: Zur Relativierung eines forschungsgeschichtlichen Mythologems. Mitteilungen der Berliner Gesellschaft für Anthropologie, Ethnologie und Urgeschichte 16: 33–37Google Scholar
  63. Eldredge N, Gould SJ (1972) Punctuated equilibria: An alternative to phyletic gradualism. In: Schopf TJM (ed) Models in paleobiology. Freeman Cooper & Co., San Francisco, pp 82–115Google Scholar
  64. Enard W (2005) Mensch und Schimpanse. Ein genetischer Vergleich. In: Kleeberg B, Crivellari F, Walter T (eds) Urmensch und Wissenschaften. Festschrift Dieter Groh zum 70sten Geburtstag. Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt, pp 125–136Google Scholar
  65. Erickson PA (1976) The origins of physical anthropology. Ph.D. dissertation, University of ConnecticutGoogle Scholar
  66. Finlayson C (2004) Neanderthals and modern humans. An ecological and evolutionary perspective. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Fischer E (1917) Gustav Schwalbe. Zeitschr. f. Morphologie u. Anthropologie 20: I–VIIIGoogle Scholar
  68. Fleagle JG (1999) Primate adaptation and evolution, 2nd edn. Academic Press, San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  69. Foley RA (1987) Another unique species. Patterns in human evolutionary ecology. Longman, HarlowGoogle Scholar
  70. Foley RA (2001) In the shadow of the modern synthesis? Alternative perspectives on the last fifty years of palaeoanthropology. Evol Anthropol 10: 5–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  71. Franck G (1997) Die Ökonomie der Aufmerksamkeit. Ein anderer Blick auf die Wissenschaften. In: Fischer EP (Hrsg.) Mannheimer Forum 1996/1997. Ein Panorama der Naturwissenschaften. Boehringer Mannheim GmbH, Mannheim, pp 171–210Google Scholar
  72. Franck G (1998a) Ökonomie der Aufmerksamkeit. Hanser, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  73. Franck, G. (1998b) The economy of attention. http://www.t0.or.at/franck/gfeconom.htmGoogle Scholar
  74. Franzen J (ed) (1994) 100 Years of pithecanthropus. The Homo erectus problem. Cour. Forsch.-Inst. Senckenberg, 171, Senckenberg, Frankfurt a. MGoogle Scholar
  75. Freeman S, Herron JC (1998) Evolutionary analysis. Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJGoogle Scholar
  76. Gabunia L, Antón S C, Lordkipanidze D, Vekua A, Justus A, Swisher III CC (2002) Dmanisi and dispersal. Evol. Anthropol 10: 158–170Google Scholar
  77. Gabunia L, Vekua A, Swisher CC, III, Ferring R, Justus A, Nioradze M et al. (2000) Earliest Pleistocene hominid cranial remains from Dmanisi, Republic of Georgia: Taxonomy, geological setting, and age. Science 288: 1019–1025PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Gabunia LK, Jöris O, Justus A, Lordkipanidze D, Muschelišvili A, Swisher CC, Vekua AK et al. (1999) Neue Hominidenfunde des altpaläolithischen Fundplatzes Dmanisi (Georgien, Kaukasus) im Kontext aktueller Grabungsergebnisse. Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt 22(4): 451–488Google Scholar
  79. Gamble C (1999) The palaeolithic societies of Europe. Cambridge World Archaeology, Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  80. Glowatzki G (1979) Wilhem Kattwinkel, der Entdecker der Olduway-Schlucht. Homo 30: 124–125Google Scholar
  81. Gorjanovič- Kramberger D (1906) Der diluviale Mensch von Krapina in Kroatia. Ein Beitrag zur Paläoanthropologie. C.W. Kreidels Verlag, WiesbadenGoogle Scholar
  82. Goschler C (2002) Rudolf Virchow. Mediziner – Anthropologe – Politiker. Böhlau Verlag, Köln, Weimar, WienGoogle Scholar
  83. Gould SJ (1983) The mismeasure of man. Penguin, LondonGoogle Scholar
  84. Grimm H (1961) Einführung in die Anthropologie. VEB Gustav Fischer Verlag, JenaGoogle Scholar
  85. Grine FE (ed) (1988) Evolutionary history of the “robust” Australopithecines. Aldine de Gruyter, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  86. Groethuysen B (Hrsg.) (1990) Wilhelm Dilthey. Einleitung in die Geisteswissenschaften. Versuch einer Grundlegung für das Studium der Gesellschaft und der Geschichte. Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, GöttingenGoogle Scholar
  87. Groves C (2001) Primate taxonomy. Smithsonian Institution, Washington and LondonGoogle Scholar
  88. Grupe G, Peters J (eds) (2003) Decyphering ancient bones. The research potential of bioarchaeological collections. Documenta Archaeobiologiae. Jahrbuch der Staatsammlung für Anthropologie und Paläoanatomie München. Bd. 1. Verlag Marie Leidorf GmbH, Rahden/WestfGoogle Scholar
  89. Haddon AC (1910) The study of man. J Murray, LondonGoogle Scholar
  90. Haeckel E (1866) Generelle Morphologie der Organismen. 2 Bände. G. Reimer Verlag, BerlinCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Haeckel E (1898) Natürliche Schöpfungs-Geschichte. 9. Aufl., Zweiter Theil: Allgemeine Stammesgeschichte. Verlag, BerlinCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Haeckel E (1902) Gemeinverständliche Vorträge und Abhandlungen aus dem Gebiete der Entwicklungslehre. Bd. 1 und 2, Verlag, BonnGoogle Scholar
  93. Haeckel E (1905) Der Kampf um den Entwicklungs-Gedanken. Druck und Verlag Georg Reimer, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  94. Haeckel E (1922) Über den Ursprung des Menschen. Vortrag, gehalten auf dem 4. Internationalen Zoologen-Kongress in Cambridge am 26. August 1898. Mit einem Nachwort über Phyletische Anthropologie. Dreizehnte Auflage. A. Kröner Verlag, LeipzigGoogle Scholar
  95. Harter R (1996–1997) Piltdown man. The bogus bones caper http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/piltdown.html this article is being mirrored from http://home.tiac.net/∼cri_a/piltdown/piltdown.htmlGoogle Scholar
  96. Hartwig WC (ed) 2002 The primate fossil record. University Press Cambridge, Cambridge UKGoogle Scholar
  97. Hawkins M (1997) Social Darwinism in European and American thought, 1860–1945: Nature and model and nature as threat. Cambridge University Press, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. Heberer G (Hrsg.) (1943) Die Evolution der Organismen. Ergebnisse und Probleme der Abstammungslehre. 1. Auflage., Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  99. Heberer G (1955a) Pierre Marcelin Boule. Der Erforscher des fossilen Menschen. In: Schwerte H, Spengler W (Hrsg.) Forscher und Wissenschaftler im heutigen Europa. Erforscher des Lebens. Mediziner, Biologen, Anthropologen. Gerhard Stalling Verlag, Oldenburg (Oldb.), Hamburg, pp 288–295Google Scholar
  100. Heberer G (1955b) Schwalbe-Klaatsch-Mollison. Die Abstammung des Menschen. In: Schwerte H, Spengler W (Hrsg.) Forscher und Wissenschaftler im heutigen Europa. Erforscher des Lebens. Mediziner, Biologen, Anthropologen. Gerhard Stalling Verlag, Oldenburg (Oldb.), Hamburg, S296–S307Google Scholar
  101. Heberer G (Hrsg.) (1959) Die Evolution der Organismen. Ergebnisse und Probleme der Abstammungslehre. 2 Bde. 2. erw. Auflage., Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  102. Heberer G (1965) Zur Geschichte der Evolutionstheorie besonders in ihrer Anwendung auf den Menschen. In: Heberer G (Hrsg.) Menschliche Abstammungslehre. Fortschritte der “Anthropogenie” 1863–1964. Gustav Fischer Verlag, Stuttgart, pp 1–19Google Scholar
  103. Heberer G (1968a) Homo – unsere Ab- und Zukunft. Herkunft und Entwicklung des Menschen aus der Sicht der aktuellen Anthropologie. Deutsche Verlagsanstalt, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  104. Heberer G (Hrsg.) (1968b) Der gerechtfertigte Haeckel. Einblicke in seine Schriften aus Anlaß des Erscheinens des Hauptwerkes “Generelle Morphologie der Organismen” vor 100 Jahren, G. Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  105. Heberer G (Hrsg.) (1967–1974) Die Evolution der Organismen. Ergebnisse und Probleme der Abstammungslehre. 3. Auflage in 3 Bänden, Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  106. Heberer G (1981) Darwins Urteil über die abstammungsgeschichtliche Herkunft des Menschen und die heutige paläoanthropologische Forschung. In: Altner G (Hrsg.) Der Darwinismus. Die Geschichte einer Theorie. Wiss. Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt. pp 374–412Google Scholar
  107. Hemleben J (1996) Charles Darwin. 12. Auflage, Rowohlt, Reinbek bei HamburgGoogle Scholar
  108. Henke W (2003a) Evaluating human fossil finds. In: Grupe G, Peters J (eds) Decyphering ancient bones. The research potential of bioarchaeological collections. Verlag Marie Leidorf GmbH, Rahden/Westf., pp 59–79Google Scholar
  109. Henke W (2003b) Population dynamics during the European Middle and Late Pleistocene—smooth or jumpy? In: Burdukiewicz M, Fiedler L, Heinrich W-D, Justus A, Brühl E (eds) Erkenntnisjäger. Kultur und Umwelt des frühen Menschen. Festschrift für Dietrich Mania. Veröffentlichungen des Landesamtes für Archäologie Sachsen-Anhalt – Landesmuseum für Vorgschichte, Band 57/I, pp 247–258Google Scholar
  110. Henke W (2004) Evolution und Verbreitung der Genus Homo. Aktuelle Befunde aus evolutionsökologischer Sicht. In: Conard NJ (ed) Woher kommt der Mensch. Attempto Verlag, Tübingen, pp S98–135Google Scholar
  111. Henke W (2005) Human biological evolution. In: Wuketits FM, Ayala FJ (eds) Handbook of evolution. Vol 2, the evolution of living systems (including hominids). Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, pp 117–222CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  112. Henke W (2006) Gorjanović'-Kramberger's Research on Krapina–its impact on paleoanthropology in Germany. Periodicum Biologorum Vol 108, No3: 239–252Google Scholar
  113. Henke W, Rothe H (1994) Paläoanthropologie. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  114. Henke W, Rothe H (1999a) Einführung in die Stammesgeschichte des Menschen. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  115. Henke W, Rothe H (1999b) Die phylogenetische Stellung des Neandertalers. Biologie in unserer Zeit 29: 320–329CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  116. Henke W, Rothe H (2003) Menschwerdung. Fischer Kompakt, S. Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  117. Henke W, Rothe H (2005) Ursprung, Adaptation und Verbreitung der Gattung Homo. In: Kleeberg B, Crivellari F, Walter T (eds) Urmensch und Wissenschaften. Festschrift Dieter Groh zum 70sten Geburtstag. Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt, pp S89–123Google Scholar
  118. Henke W, Rothe H (2006) Zur Entwicklung der Paläoanthropologie im 20. Jahrhundert Von der Narration zur hypothetiko-deduktiven Forschungsdisziplin. In: Preuß D, Breidbach O, Hoßfeld U (Hrsg.) Anthropologie nach Haeckel. Franz Steiner Verlag, Stuttgart, S46-S71Google Scholar
  119. Henke W, Roth H, Simon C (1995) Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the Dmanisi mandible. In: Radlanski RJ, Renz H (eds) Proceedings of the 10th international symposium on dental morphology, Berlin 6–10, 1995. C. u. M. Brünne GbR, Berlin, pp 250–256Google Scholar
  120. Hennig W (1950) Grundzüge einer Theorie der phylogenetischen Systematik. Deutscher Zentralverlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  121. Hennig W (1966) Phylogenetic systematics. University of Illinois Press, UrbanaGoogle Scholar
  122. Hennig H (1982) Phylogenetische Systematik. Paul Parey, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  123. Hennig W (1984) Aufgaben und Probleme stammesgeschichtlicher Forschung. Paul Parey, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  124. Herrmann B (Hrsg.) (1986) Innovative rends in der prähistorischen Anthropologie. Mitt. Berliner Ges. Anthrop. Ethnol. Urgesch., Band 7, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  125. Herrmann B (Hrsg.) (1994) Archäometrie. Naturwissenschaftliche Analyse von Sachüberresten. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkGoogle Scholar
  126. Hofer H, Altner G (Hrsg.) (1972) Die Sonderstellung des Menschen. Naturwissenchaftliche und geisteswissenschaftliche Aspekte. Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  127. Hofstadter R. (1995) Social Darwinism in American thought. Beacon Press, BostonGoogle Scholar
  128. Hooton EA (1931) Up from the ape. The Macmillan Company, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  129. Hoßfeld U (1997) Gerhard Heberer (1901–1973)—Sein Beitrag zur Biologie im 20. Jahrhundert.—Jahrbuch für Geschichte und Theorie der Biologie, Suppl. Bd. 1—VWB-Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  130. Hoßfeld U (2005a) Reflexionen zur Paläoanthropologie in der deutschsprachigen evolutionsbiologischen Literatur der 1940er bis 1970er Jahre. In: Kleeberg B, Walter T, Crivellari F (Hrsg.) Urmensch und Wissenschaften. Eine Bestandsaufnahme, S59–88Google Scholar
  131. Hoßfeld U (2005) Geschichte der biologischen Anthropologie in Deutschland. Von den Anfängen bis in die Nachkriegszeit, Franz Steiner Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  132. Hoßfeld U, Breidbach O (2005) Ernst Haeckels Politisierung der Biologie. Thüringen, Blätter zur Landeskunde 54: 1–8Google Scholar
  133. Hoßfeld U, Junker T (2003) Anthropologie und synthetischer Darwinismus im Dritten Reich: Die Evolution der Organismen (1943). Anthrop Anz 61: 85–114Google Scholar
  134. Howell FC (1978) Hominidae. In: Maglio VJ, Cooke HBS (eds) Evolution in African mammals. Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass, pp 154–248Google Scholar
  135. Howell FC (1996) Thoughts on the study and interpretation of the human fossil record. In: Meikle WE, Howell FC, Jablonski NG (eds) Contemporary issues in human evolution. California Academy of Sciences Memoir 21, San Francisco California, pp 1–46Google Scholar
  136. Howells WW (1993) Getting here: the story of human evolution. Compass Press, WashingtonGoogle Scholar
  137. Hrdlička A (1914) The most ancient remains of man, Annual report of Smithsonian Institute, 1913. Government Printing Office, Washington, pp 491–552Google Scholar
  138. Hull DL (1985) Darwinism as an historical entity: A historiographical proposal. In: Kohn D (ed) The Darwinian heritage. Princeton University Press, Princeton, pp 773–812Google Scholar
  139. Hull DL (1988) Science as a process: an evolutionary account of the social and conceptual development of science. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  140. Huxley TH (1863) Evidences as to man's place in nature. Williams and Norgate, LondonGoogle Scholar
  141. Ickerodt UF (2005) Bilder von Archäologen, Bilder von Urmenschen – Ein kultur- und mentalitätsgeschichtlicher Beitrag zur Genese der prähistorischen Archäologie am Beispiel zeitgenössischer Quellen. Ph.D., FB Kunst-, Orient- und Altertumswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-WittenbergGoogle Scholar
  142. Isaac GLl, McCown ER (eds) (1976) Human origins. Louis Leakey and the East African evidence. A Staples Press Book, W.A. Benjamin, Inc., Menlo Park CaliforniaGoogle Scholar
  143. Jahn I (Hrsg.) (2000) Geschichte der Biologie. Theorien, Methoden, Institutionen, Kurzbiographien. Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, Heidelberg BerlinGoogle Scholar
  144. Jahn I, Löther R, Senglaub K (Hrsg.) (1982) Geschichte der Biologie. 1. Aufl., Gustav Fischer Verlag, JenaGoogle Scholar
  145. Jobling MA, Hurles ME, Tyler-Smith C (2004) Human evolutionary genetics. Origins, peoples & disease, Garland Publishing Company, Taylor & Francis Group, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  146. Johanson D, Edey MA (1980) Lucy: the beginnings of humankind. Simon and Schuster, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  147. Johanson D, Edgar B (1996) From Lucy to language. Principal photogryphy by David Brill. A Peter N. Nevraumont Book. Simons & SchusterGoogle Scholar
  148. Jones S, Martin RD, Pilbeam D (eds) (1992) The Cambridge encyclopedia of human evolution. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  149. Junker T (2004) Die zweite Darwinsche Revolution. Geschichte des Synthetischen Darwinismus in Deutschland 1924 bis 1950. Basilisken –Presse, MarburgGoogle Scholar
  150. Keith A (1896) An introduction to the study of anthropoid apes. Natural Science (London) 9: 26–37, 250–265, 316–326, 372–379Google Scholar
  151. Keith A (1911) Ancient types of man. Harper, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  152. Keith A (1915) The antiquity of man. Williams & Norgate, LondonGoogle Scholar
  153. Keith A (1925) The antiquity of man. London, 2nd edn. in two volumes. Williams & Norgate, LondonGoogle Scholar
  154. Keith A (1927) Concerning man's origin. Williams & Norgate, LondonGoogle Scholar
  155. Keith A (1931) New discoveries of the antiquities of man. Williams & Norgate, LondonGoogle Scholar
  156. Keller C (1995) Der Schädelvermesser. Otto Schlaginhaufen—Anthropologe und Rassenhygieniker. Limmat Verlag, ZürichGoogle Scholar
  157. Klaatsch H (1899) Die fossilen Knochenreste des Menschen und ihre Bedeutung für das Abstammungsproblem. Erg Anat Entw Geschichte 9: 487–498Google Scholar
  158. Kleeberg B Anthropologie als Zoologie. Bemerkungen zu Ernst Haeckels Entwurf des Menschen. http://www.ub.uni-konstanz.de/kops/volltexte/2000/563/pdf/Anthropologie_ als_Zoologie.pdfGoogle Scholar
  159. Klein RG (1989) The human career. Human biological and cultural orgings. The University of Chicago Press, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  160. Klein RG, Edgar B (2002) The dawn of human culture. Jon Wiley & Sons, LondonGoogle Scholar
  161. Koenigswald GHRv (Hrsg.) (1958) Hundert Jahre Neanderthaler. Neanderthal Centenary 1856 – 1956. Beihefte der Bonner Jahrbücher Bd. 7, Böhlau Verlag, Köln, GrazGoogle Scholar
  162. Koenigswald GHRv (1971) The evolution of man. University of Michigan Press, Ann ArborGoogle Scholar
  163. Kollmann J (1885) Das Ueberwintern von europäischen Frosch- und Tritonlarven und die Umwandlung des mexikanischen Axolotl. Verhandlungen der Naturforschenden Gesellschaft in Basel 7: 387–398Google Scholar
  164. Kollmann J (1902) Die Pygmäen und ihre systematische Stellung innerhalb des Menschengeschlechts. Verhandlungen der naturforsch. Gesellschaft in Basel XVI: 85–117Google Scholar
  165. Krings M, Stone A, Schmitz RW, Krainitzki H, Stoneking M, Pääbo S (1997) Neandertal DNA sequences and the origin of modern humans. Cell 90: 19–30PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  166. Kroeber AL (1953) Chapter 20, concluding review. In: Tax S, Eiseley LC, Rouse I, Voegelin CF (eds) An appraisal of anthropology today. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, pp 357–376Google Scholar
  167. Kuhn TS (1962) Die Struktur wissenschaftlicher Revolutionen. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt am MainGoogle Scholar
  168. Kurth G (Hrsg.) (1962) Evolution und Hominisation. Festschrift zum 60. Geburtstag von Gerhard Heberer. Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  169. Kurth G (Hrsg.) (1968) Evolution und Hominisation. Beiträge zur Evolutionstheorie wie Datierung, Klassifizierung und Leistungsfähigkeit der humanen Hominiden. Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  170. Kurth G, Eibl- Eibesfeldt I (Hrsg.) (1975) Hominisation und Verhalten. Gustav Fischer Verlag, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  171. Landau M (1991) Narratives in human evolution. Yale University Press, New HavenGoogle Scholar
  172. Le Gros Clark WE (1934) Early forerunners of man. Baillière, Tindall and Cox, LondonGoogle Scholar
  173. Leakey MG, Leakey RE (eds) (1978) Koobi fora research project, vol I. The fossils hominids and an introduction to their context. 1968–1974. Clarendon Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  174. Lyell C (1863) Geological evidences of the antiquity of man. John Murray, LondonGoogle Scholar
  175. Mac Phee RDE (1993) Primates and their relatives in phylogenetic perspective. Plenum Press, New York and LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  176. Magori CC, Saanane CB, Schrenk F (eds) (1996) Four million years of hominid evolution in Africa. Papers in honour of Dr. Mary Douglas Leakey's outstanding contribution in palaeoanthropology, KAUPIA, Darmstädter Beiträge zur Naturgeschichte, H. 6. DarmstadtGoogle Scholar
  177. Mahner M, Bunge M (2000) Philosophische Grundlagen der Biologie Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  178. Martin RD (1990) Primate origins and evolution. A phylogenetic reconstruction. Chapman and Hall, LondonGoogle Scholar
  179. Mayr E (1942) Systematics and the origin of species. Columbia Modern Science, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  180. Mayr E (1950) Taxonomic categories in fossil hominids. Cold Spring Harb Symp Quant Biol 15: 109–118PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  181. Mayr E (1982) The growth of biological thought. Diversity, evolution, inheritance. Belknap Press, Cambridge MassGoogle Scholar
  182. McHenry H (1996) Homoplasy, clades, and hominid phylogeny. In: Meikle WE, Howell FC, Jablonski NG (eds) Contemporary issues in human evolution. California Academy of Sciences Memoir 21, San Francisco California, pp 77–89Google Scholar
  183. Menke P (this volume) The ontogeny-phylogeny nexus in the nutshell: lmplications for primatology and paleoanthropologyGoogle Scholar
  184. Miller GF (1998) The mating mind. How sexual choice the evolution of human nature. Doubleday (Random House), New YorkGoogle Scholar
  185. Mingh-Purvis N, McNamara KJ (eds) (2002) Human evolution through developmental change. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore MarylandGoogle Scholar
  186. Mittelstraß J (1989) Wohin geht die Wissenschaft? Über Disziplinarität,. Transdisziplinarität und das Wissen in einer Leibniz-Welt. Konstanzer Blätter für Hochschulfragen 26/1-2, 1989, 97–115Google Scholar
  187. Mühlmann WE (1968) Geschichte der Anthropologie. 2. Auflage, Athenäum Verlag, Frankfurt a.M., BonnGoogle Scholar
  188. Müller- Hill B (1988) Tödliche Wissenschaft. Die Aussonderung von Juden, Zigeunern und Geisteskranken 1933–1945. Rororo, ReinbeckGoogle Scholar
  189. Murray T (2001) On normalizing the palaeolithic: an orthodoxy questioned. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 29–44Google Scholar
  190. O'Rourke DH, Hayes MG, Carlyle SW (2000) Ancient DNA studies in physical anthropology. Annu Rev Anthropol 29: 217–242CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  191. Osche G (1983) Die Sonderstellung des Menschen in evolutionsbiologischer Sicht. Nova Acta Leopoldina NF 55(253): 57–72Google Scholar
  192. Oxnard CE (1984) The order of man. A biomathematical anatomy of primates. Yale University Press, New Haven and LondonGoogle Scholar
  193. Pickford M, Senut B (2001) The geological and faunal context of Late Miocene hominid remains from Lukeino, Kenya. Comptes Rendus de l'Académie de Sciences 332: 145–152Google Scholar
  194. Pitsios TK (1999) Paleoanthropological research at the cave site of Apidima and the surrounding region (South Peloponnes, Greece). Anthrop Anz 57(1): 1–11Google Scholar
  195. Pittendrigh CS (1958) Adaptation, natural selection, and behaviour. In: Roe A, Simpson GG (eds) Behavior and evolution. Yale University Press, New Haven, pp 390–416Google Scholar
  196. Popper K (1959a) Has history any meaning? In: Meyerhoff H (ed) The philosophy of history in our time. Doubleday Anchor Books, New York, pp 301–311Google Scholar
  197. Popper K (1959b) The logic of scientific discovery. University of Toronto Press, TorontoGoogle Scholar
  198. Popper K (1968) Conjectures and refutations: The growth of scientific knowledge. Harper & Raw, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  199. Popper K (1983) Objective knowledge. An evolutionary approach, 7th edn. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  200. Porr M (1998) Ethnoarchäologie. Ein Plädoyer für Interdisziplinarität und Disziplinlosigkeit in der Archäologie. Archäologische Informationen 21/1: 41–49Google Scholar
  201. Radovčić J, Smith FH, Trinkaus T, Wolpoff MH (1988) The krapina hominids. An illustrated catalog of skeletal collection. Croatian Natural History Museum, ZagrebGoogle Scholar
  202. Reche O (1937) Begrüßung. Verhandlungen der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Physische Anthropologie 8: 1–3Google Scholar
  203. Reck H (1925) Grabung auf fossile Wirbeltiere in Ostafrika. Geolog. Charakterbilder Heft 31, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  204. Relethford JH (2001) Genetics and the search for modern human origins. A. John Wiley & Sons., Inc., Publication, New York WeinheimGoogle Scholar
  205. Riedl R (1975) Die Ordnung des Lebendigen. Systembedingungen der Evolution. Paul Parey, Hamburg, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  206. Rieppel O (1999) Einführung in die computergestützte Kladistik. Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  207. Rightmire GP (1990) The evolution of homo erectus. Comparative anatomical studies of an extinct human species. Cambridge University Press, CambridgeCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  208. Rolle F (1863) Ch[arle]s Darwins Lehre von der Entstehung der Arten im Pflanzen- und Thierreich in ihrer Anwendung auf die Schöpfungsgeschichte dargestellt und erläutert. Johann Christ. Hermann'sche Vlgsbhdl., F.E., Suchsland, FrankfurtGoogle Scholar
  209. Ross CF, Kay RF (eds) (2004) Anthropoid origins. New visions. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  210. Rothe H, Henke W (2005) Machiavellistische Intelligenz bei Primaten. Sind die Sozialsysteme der Menschenaffen Modelle für frühmenschliche Gesellschaften? In: Kleeberg B, Walter T, Crivellari F (Hrsg.) Urmensch und Wissenschaften. Eine Bestandsaufnahme. Wiss. Buchgesellschaft Darnstadt, Darmstadt, pp 161–194Google Scholar
  211. Rudwick MJS (1997) Georges Cuvier, fossil bones, and geological catastrophes: new translations and interpretations of the primary texts. University of Chicago Press, ChicagoCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  212. Ruse M (2005) The evolution controversies: an overview. In: Wuketits FM, Ayala FJ (eds) Handbook of evolution. Vol 2, the evolution of living systems (including hominids). Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, pp 27–56CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  213. Sackett J (2000) Human antiquity and the old stone age: the nineteenth century background to paleoanthropology. Evol Anthropol 9: 37–49CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  214. Sander K (1976) Zur Geschichte der Biologie. In: Todt D (Hrsg.) Biologie 1 (Systeme des Lebendigen). Funk-Kolleg Biologie. Fischer, Frankfurt/Main, pp 23–44Google Scholar
  215. Schipperges H (1994) Rudolf Virchow. Rowohlt, Reinbek bei HamburgGoogle Scholar
  216. Schmerling C-P (1833) Recherches sur les ossements fossiles découvertes dans les caverns de la Province de Liège. P-J Collardin, LiègeGoogle Scholar
  217. Schmitz R, Thissen R (2000) Neandertal. Die Geschichte geht weiter. Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  218. Schmitz S (Hrsg.) (1982) Charles Darwin—ein Leben. Autobiographie, Briefe, Dokumente. dtv-Biographie, Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  219. Schoetensack O (1908) Der Unterkiefer des Homo Heidelbergensis aus den Sanden von Mauer bei Heidelberg. Ein Beitrag zur Paläontologie des Menschen. Engelmann, LeipzigGoogle Scholar
  220. Schott L (1979) Der Skelettfund aus dem Neandertal im Urteil Rudolf Virchows. Biol Rdsch. 19: 304–309Google Scholar
  221. Schrenk F, Bromage TG (2002) Adams Eltern. Expeditionen in die Welt der Frühmenschen. Aufgezeichnet von Stephanie Müller. Verlag. C.H. Beck, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  222. Schwalbe G (1906) Studien zur Vorgeschichte des Menschen. E. Schweizerbart'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung (E. Nägele), StuttgartCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  223. Schwartz JH, Tattersall I (2002) Human fossil record: craniodental morphology of genus australopiths, vol 4. Wiley-Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  224. Schwartz JH, Tattersall I (2003) The human fossil record, craniodental morphology of genus Homo (Africa and Asia), Vol 2. Wiley-Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  225. Seidler H, Rett A (1988) Rassenhygiene - ein Weg in den Nationalsozialismus. J u. V, Wien, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  226. Shapiro HL (1974) Peking man. Simon and Schuster, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  227. Shipman P (1994) The evolution of racism. Simon and Schuster, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  228. Shipman P (2001) The man who found the missing link: the extraordinary life of Eugene Dubois. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, LondonGoogle Scholar
  229. Shipman P, Storm P (2002) Missing links: Eugène Dubois and the origins of palaeoanthropology. Evol Anthropol 11(3): 108–116CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  230. Simpson GG (1944) Tempo and mode in evolution. Columbia University Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  231. Sommer M (2004) ‘An amusing account of a cave in Wales’: William Buckland (1784–1856) and the Red Lady of Paviland. Brit J Hist Sci 37: 53–74CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  232. Spencer F (1984) The neandertals and their evolutionary significance: a brief historical survey. In: Smith FH, Spencer F (eds) The origins of modern humans. A world survey of the fossil evidence. Alan R. Liss, Inc., New York, pp 1–49Google Scholar
  233. Spencer F (1990a) The piltdown papers 1908–1955. Natural History Museum, Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  234. Spencer F (1990b) Piltdown—a scientific forgery. Natural History Museum, Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  235. Spiegel-Rösing I, Schwidetzky I (1982) Maus und Schlange. Untersuchungen zur Lage der deutschen Anthropologie. R. Oldenbourg Verlag, München, WienGoogle Scholar
  236. Starck D (1962) Der heutige Stand des Fetalisationsproblems. Verlag Paul Parey, Hamburg BerlinGoogle Scholar
  237. Smith FH, Spencer F (eds) (1984) The origins of modern humans. A world survey of the fossil evidence. Alan R. Liss, Inc., New YorkGoogle Scholar
  238. Stepan N (1982) The idea of race in science: Great Britain 1800–1960. Macmillan, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  239. Stringer C, Gamble C (1993) In search of the Neanderthals. Solving the puzzle of human origins. Thames and Hudson, LondonGoogle Scholar
  240. Tattersall I (1995) The fossil trail. How we know what we think we know about human evolution. Hartcourt Brace & Company, New York San Diego LondonGoogle Scholar
  241. Tattersall I (2000a) Paleoanthropology: the last half-century. Evol Anthropol 9: 2–16CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  242. Tattersall I (2000b) Once we were not alone. Sci Am 2: 56–63CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  243. Tattersall I, Schwartz J (2000) Extinct humans. Westview, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  244. Theunissen B (1981) Eugène Dubois and the ape-man from java. The history of the first ‘Missing Link’ and its discoverer. Kluwer Academic Publications, DordrechtGoogle Scholar
  245. Theunissen B (2001) Does disciplinary history matter? An epilogue. In: Corbey R, Roebroeks W (eds) Studying human origins. Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp 147–152Google Scholar
  246. Thieme H (1996) Altpaläolithische Wurfspeere aus Schöningen, Niedersachsen. Archäologisches Korrespondenzblatt 26: 377–393Google Scholar
  247. Tobias PhV (1984) Dart, Taung and the ‘missing link’. An essay on the life and work of Emeritus Professor Raymond Dart. Witwatersrand University Press, JohannesburgGoogle Scholar
  248. Tobias PhV (1991) Olduvai Gorge, vol 4, Pts I–IV and V–IX. Cambridge University Press, CambrigdeGoogle Scholar
  249. Tomasello M (1999) The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard University Press, Cambridge Mass, LondonGoogle Scholar
  250. Trinkaus E, Shipman P (1993) The. neandertals. Alfred A. Knopf, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  251. Trümper J (2004) Der wissenschaftskonstituierende Einfluss Rudolf Virchows auf die Paläoanthropologie. Hausarbeit zur Erlangung des Akademischen Grades eines Magister Artium. FB Sozialwissenschaften, Universität; MainzGoogle Scholar
  252. Turritin T (1996–1997) A mostly complete Piltdown man bibliography. http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/piltdown/piltref.htmlGoogle Scholar
  253. Ullrich H (ed) (1995) Man and environment in the palaeolithic, 1-8. Liège Etudes et Recherches Archéologiques de I'Université de Liège n° 62, Liège (Eraul 62)Google Scholar
  254. Ullrich H (ed) (1999) Introduction to hominid evolution—lifestyles and survival strategies. In: Ullrich H (ed) Hominid evolution—lifestyles and survival strategies. Edition Archaea, GelsenkirchenGoogle Scholar
  255. Vekua A, Lordkipanidze D, Rightmire GP, Agusti J, Ferring R, Maisuradze G et al. (2002) A new skull of early Homo from Dmanisi, Georgia. Science 297: 85–89PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  256. Vogel C (1966) Die Bedeutung der Primatenkunde für die Anthropologie. Naturw Rdsch 19: 415–421Google Scholar
  257. Vogel C (1982) Charles Darwin, sein Werk “Die Abstammung des Menschen” und die Folgen. In: Darwin C, Die Abstammung des Menschen. Übersetzt von Heinrich Schmidt. Alfred Kröner Verlag, Stuttgart, S VII–XLIIGoogle Scholar
  258. Vogel C (1983) Biologische Perspektiven der Anthropologie: Gedanken zum Theorie-Defizit der biologischen Anthropologie in Deutschland. Z Morph Anthrop 73: 225–236Google Scholar
  259. Vogel C (2000) Anthropologische Spuren. Zur Natur des Menschen. Essays herausgegeben von Volker Sommer. Hirzel, Stuttgart LeipzigGoogle Scholar
  260. Vogt C (1863) Vorlesungen über den Menschen, seine Stellung in der Schöpfung und in der Geschichte der Erde. Erster Band. J. Ricker'sche Buchhandlung, GießenGoogle Scholar
  261. Voland E (2000) Grundriß der Soziobiologie. 2. überarbeitete Auflage. Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, HeidelbergGoogle Scholar
  262. Voland E, Grammer (eds) (2002) Evolutionary aesthetics. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkGoogle Scholar
  263. Vollmer G (2003) Was können wir wissen& Bd. 2, Die Erkenntnis der Natur. Beiträge der modernen Naturphilosophie, S. Hirzel, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  264. de Waal F (2000) Selections from the ape and the Sushi Master: cultural reflections of a primatologist. Basic Books, Perseus Book Group, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  265. Waegele J-W (2000) Grundlagen der Phylogenetischen Systematik. Verlag Dr. Friedrich Pfeil, MünchenGoogle Scholar
  266. Wagner GA, Beinhauer KW (Hrsg.) (1997) Homo heidelbergensis von Mauer. Das Auftreten des Menschen in Europa. HVA, HeidelbergGoogle Scholar
  267. Walker A, Leakey R (eds) (1993) The Nariokotome Homo erectus skeleton. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg LondonGoogle Scholar
  268. Walsh J (1996) Unravelling piltdown, the scientific fraud of the century and its solution. Random House, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  269. Washburn SL (1953) The strategy of physical anthropology. In: Kroeber AL (ed) Anthropology today. University Press of Chicago, Chicago, pp 714–727Google Scholar
  270. Weidenreich F (1943) The skull of Sinanthropus pekinensis: a comparative study of a primative hominid skull. Palaeontologia Sinica, New Seris D, Nr. 10: 1–184Google Scholar
  271. Weiner J, Stringer C (2003) The piltdown forgery (50th anniversary edition). Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  272. Weinert H (1928) C. Anthropologie. In: Wiegers F (Bearb.) Diluviale Vorgeschichte des Menschen. Verlag von Ferdinand Enke, Stuttgart, S199–S207Google Scholar
  273. Weingart P, Kroll J, Bayertz K (1988) Rasse, Blut und Gene. Geschichte der Eugenik und Rassenhygiene in Deutschland. Suhrkamp, Frankfurt a.MGoogle Scholar
  274. Werth E (1921) Der fossile Mensch. Grundzüge einer Paläoanthropologie. Verlag von Gebrüder Borntraeger, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  275. White TD (1988) The comparative biology of “Robust” Australopithecus: clues from context. In: Grine FE (ed) Evolutionary history of the “robust” australopithecines. Aldine de Gruyter, New York, pp 449–483Google Scholar
  276. White TD (2000) A view on the science: physical anthropology at the millennium. Am J Phys Anthropol 113: 287–292PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  277. Wiegers F (1928) Diluviale Vorgeschichte des Menschen. Allgemeine Diluvialprähistorie. Mit einem beitrag: Die fossilen Menschenreste von Dr. Hand Weinert. Verlag von Ferdinand Enke, StuttgartGoogle Scholar
  278. Wiesemüller B, Rothe H, Henke R (2003) Phylogenetische Systematik. Eine Einführung. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  279. Wilson EO (1975) Sociobiology: the new synthesis. Harvard University Press, CambridgeGoogle Scholar
  280. Wolpoff MH (1999) Paleoanthropology, 2nd edn. McGraw-Hill, Boston MassGoogle Scholar
  281. Wolpoff MH, Caspari R (1997) Race and human evolution. A fatal attraction. Westview Press, Boulder ColoradoGoogle Scholar
  282. Wood B (1991) Koobi fora research project. Vol 4, Hominid cranial remains. Clarendon Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  283. Wood B (2000) Investigating human evolutionary history. J Anat 197: 3–17PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  284. Wood B, Richmond BG (2000) Human evolution: taxonomy and palaeobiology. J Anat 196: 19–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  285. Wuketits FM (1978) Wissenschaftstheoretische Probleme der modernen Biologie. Erfahrung und Denken. Schriften zur Förderuung der Beziehungen zwischen Philosophie und Einzelwissenschaften. Bd. 54, Duncker & Humblot, BerlinGoogle Scholar
  286. Wuketits FM, Ayala FJ (eds) (2005) Handbook of evolution. Vol 2, the evolution of living systems (including hominids). Wiley-VCH, WeinheimGoogle Scholar
  287. Zängl-Kumpf U (1990) Hermann Schaaffhausen (1816–1893); die Entwicklung der neuen physischen Anthropologie im 19. Jahrhundert. Diss. FB Biologie, Universität Frankfurt S19–S32Google Scholar
  288. Zängl- Kumpf U (1992) Die Geschichte der ersten deutschen anthropologischen Gesellschaft. In: Preuschoft H, Kattmann U (eds) Anthropologie im Spannungsfeld zwischen Wissenschaft und Politik. Bibliotheks- und Informationssystem der Universität Oldenburg (BIS) Verlag, OldenburgGoogle Scholar
  289. Zmarzlik H-G (1969) Der Sozialdarwinismus in Deutschland—Ein Beispiel für den gesellschaftlichen Mißbrauch naturwissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse. In: Altner G (Hrsg.) Kreatur Mensch. Moderne Wissenschaft auf der Suche nach dem Humanum. Heinz Moss Verlag, München, pp 147–156Google Scholar
  290. Zollikofer C, Ponce de Leon M (2005) Virtual reconstruction: a primer in computer-assisted paleontology and biomedicine. Wiley-Interscience, WeinheimGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg New York 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Winfried Henke

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations