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Theory Theory (Simulation Theory, Theory of Mind)

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Synonyms

Theory of mind; Folk psychology

Definition

 

Theory of Mind

Theory of mind denotes the conceptual system that underlies the ability to understand, predict and interpret the thoughts, feelings and behavior of self and others by reference to specific mental states (states of mind). Originally introduced by primatologists, the term “Theory of mind” (ToM) is used to refer to (1) the ability to impute mental states, i.e. to mentalizing or mind-reading (Mentalizing, mind-reading), (2) the study of children's understanding of mind in developmental and cognitive psychology, and (3) the “Theory Theory” account of mental state attribution.

Theory Theory

Theory theory accounts for the cognitive abilities of humans in terms of a body of implicit knowledge, constituted by a representational system in the form of law-like generalizations or innatemechanisms. The central claim is that this internally represented knowledge is theory-like, because it consists of an abstract, coherent and...

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-29678-2_5984
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References

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Röska-Hardy, L. (2009). Theory Theory (Simulation Theory, Theory of Mind). In: Binder, M.D., Hirokawa, N., Windhorst, U. (eds) Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-29678-2_5984

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