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Neurophilosophy

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Neurophilosophy is an emerging field at the interface between neuroscience and philosophy. It encompasses, first, methodological, conceptual, anthropological, and ethical questions that are of relevance to neuro- and cognitive science. Second, neurophilosophy uses results from these sciences in order to shed light on related philosophical problems.

The Term “Neurophilosophy”

The term became popular after Patricia Churchland [1] used it as a title for a book and has since then received increasing attention, both in scientific literature and in academic teaching [2]. Still, “neurophilosophy” is not yet a received term for an established branch in academic philosophy like “philosophy of science” or “philosophy of history” with their own journals, academic programs, scientific societies, etc.

Nevertheless, the close connection to empirical science sets neurophilosophy apart from its predecessors, particularly from traditional philosophy of mind, although there is a significant overlap...

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Pauen, M. (2009). Neurophilosophy. In: Binder, M.D., Hirokawa, N., Windhorst, U. (eds) Encyclopedia of Neuroscience. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-29678-2_3934

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