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Responsible Management for Innovative and Sustainable Firms in the Age of Complexity

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Part of the Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals book series (ENUNSDG)

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Responsible management is about the approach managers have towards sustainability, their vision, or way of thinking about the world and the capacities they develop to face challenges they meet in their work. Thus, responsible management is a process that finds its intellectual roots in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), business ethics, and sustainability and then it develops to include the ideas of stakeholder theory, shared value, and social responsiveness. An efficient responsible management refers, among the others, to the capacity of managers to foster responsible innovation, to engage in multiple stakeholder dialogue, to develop strategic CSR initiatives, to improve risk management, to improve financial performances, to build customer loyalty, to attract and engage the best employees.

PRME – Principles of Responsible Management Education. Managers can act responsibly when educated and trained according to the principles PRME (Principles of Responsible Management...

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Correspondence to Marco Tortora .

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Tortora, M. (2021). Responsible Management for Innovative and Sustainable Firms in the Age of Complexity. In: Leal Filho, W., Azul, A.M., Brandli, L., Lange Salvia, A., Wall, T. (eds) Decent Work and Economic Growth. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95867-5_45

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