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Subcultural Theories of Crime

Abstract

This chapter will consider cybercrime offending through a subcultural perspective, which situates crime and delinquency as a function of social factors that shape the individual acceptance of values and beliefs that support action. Subcultural theories were developed throughout the mid-1900s and are still used in modern theoretical research as a means to understand a range of deviant and criminal behaviors. The historical evolution of subcultural theories will be discussed, along with contemporary examples of subcultures that operate in on- and offline contexts to influence the individual offending behaviors.

Keywords

  • Subcultural theory
  • Cybercrime
  • Computer hacking
  • Prostitution
  • Extremism

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Correspondence to Thomas J. Holt .

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Holt, T.J. (2019). Subcultural Theories of Crime. In: The Palgrave Handbook of International Cybercrime and Cyberdeviance. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90307-1_19-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-90307-1_19-1

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