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Hate Speech in Online Spaces

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The Palgrave Handbook of International Cybercrime and Cyberdeviance

Abstract

The ever-increasing centrality of the Internet, especially social media, in people’s everyday lives has led to heightened fears over the growth of hateful material online. Indeed, online hate, or cyberhate, is rapidly proliferating on the Internet, resulting in more people encountering it. In turn, mounting concerns over the effects of exposure to hateful online content have led to a swell in research on the topic. This chapter offers a summary of several key studies that examine cyberhate, beginning with a brief overview of the emergence of online hate. A detailing of the various types of hate currently permeating cyberspace follows. This segues into a discussion of factors that lead online users to come into contact with online hate, be directly victimized by cyberhate, as well as produce this type of content. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the future of cyberhate, emphasizing some of the challenges associated with reducing hateful online material in an increasingly expansive and anonymous online universe.

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Costello, M., Hawdon, J. (2020). Hate Speech in Online Spaces. In: Holt, T., Bossler, A. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of International Cybercrime and Cyberdeviance. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-78440-3_60

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