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Cancer in War-Torn Countries: Iraq as an Example

  • Layth Mula-HussainEmail author
  • Hayder Alabedi
  • Fawaz Al-Alloosh
  • Anmar Alharganee
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Iraq is a multiethnic, developing country in the Middle East. Iraq is home to one of the oldest civilizations known to mankind and has an estimated population of over 39 million people living in 18 governorates. This historically prosperous land, with a rich ancient heritage, has seen all its health systems, including its cancer care services system, decimated by wars, sanctions, and embargo that has continued since August 1990. Cancer trends and care in Iraq have transformed as a result. With reduced services, cancers are discovered in more advanced stages, reducing curability, and patient suffering has increased. This chapter discusses the current status of cancer in Iraq, its trends, and the available care services. The challenging life circumstances that Iraqis continue to face has increased suffering in the Iraqi people.

Keywords

Cancer Iraq War 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Layth Mula-Hussain
    • 1
    Email author
  • Hayder Alabedi
    • 2
  • Fawaz Al-Alloosh
    • 2
  • Anmar Alharganee
    • 3
  1. 1.Radiation OncologyCross Cancer Institute – University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  2. 2.Iraqi Cancer Board – Ministry of HealthBaghdadIraq
  3. 3.Oncology Hospital – Baghdad Medical City ComplexBaghdadIraq

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