The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Arab Spring

  • Samantha KruberEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_1-1
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Introduction

The uprisings that swept across the Middle East and North African (MENA) region throughout 2010–2011 were optimistically perceived as a signal that the repressive authoritarian rule that had characterized much of the region was coming to an end. Protesters took to the streets in unprecedented numbers first in Tunisia, then in Egypt, and eventually spread throughout much of the region, all determined to have their voices heard on a range of political and economic grievances that they had long endured.

Initially the protest movements appeared to fulfill the promise of change. Long-reigning dictatorships in Tunisia and Egypt were swiftly brought to an end, and assistance from the international community suggested that Libya too would shortly see the demise of its authoritarian leader. However, this initial positive trajectory soon took a turn. Violent crackdowns by regime forces in Bahrain, Yemen, Libya, and Syria saw many killed by open fire against demonstrators, while...

Keywords

Democratization Authoritarianism Middle East 
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References

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Further Reading

  1. Brownlee, J., Masoud, T., Reynolds, A.. (2015). The Arab Spring: Pathways of repression and reform. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Danahar, P. (2013). The new middle east: The world after the Arab Spring. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
  3. Davis, J. (2013). The Arab Spring and the Arab Thaw: Unfinished revolutions and the quest for democracy. Surrey: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  4. Seikaly, M., & Mattar, K. (Eds.). (2015). The silent revolution: The Arab Spring and the Gulf States. Berlin: Gerlach Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia