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Top-Down Climate Control for Global Environmental Stability

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Part of the Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals book series (ENUNSDG)

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The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development of the United Nations is a wide-scale action plan for people, planet, and prosperity that strengthens universal peace. Sustainable development is only possible through large-scale stakeholder engagement. In the 17 Sustainable Development Goals with their 169 widespread targets, climate justice plays a fundamental role. In particular the Sustainable Development Goal 13 addresses climate action to combat climate change and its impacts.

Climate justice has a history of being discussed in the focal point of law, economics, and governance (Puaschunder 2016c). The implementation of climate stability accounts for the most challenging contemporary global governance predicament that seems to open an abyss of world inequality regarding differing times and degrees to enjoy benefits of a warming earth around the globe. As a novel angle toward climate justice, this entry proposes a global governance solution for a well-balanced climate gains...

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Correspondence to Julia M. Puaschunder .

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Puaschunder, J.M. (2021). Top-Down Climate Control for Global Environmental Stability. In: Leal Filho, W., Azul, A.M., Brandli, L., Özuyar, P.G., Wall, T. (eds) Climate Action. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71063-1_127-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71063-1_127-1

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  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-71063-1

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