Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall

Climate Change Adaptation: Infrastructure and Extreme Weather

  • Ryan F. AllardEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71059-4_53-1

Definitions

Climate change adaptation

Measures taken in response to actual or projected climate change in order to eliminate, minimize, or manage related impacts on people, infrastructure, and the environment

Extreme weather

Weather phenomena lying in the upper or lower 10th percentile of historical weather

Infrastructure

All physical facilities that support and allow society’s functioning

Climate Change Adaptation

A response to global climate change is no longer optional, and internationally it has taken two broad roads: mitigation and adaptation. Mitigation refers to taking active steps to reduce the source of the negative climate change, namely, greenhouse gas emissions or atmospheric concentrations, and most attention has been paid to mitigation (Revi et al. 2014). Adaptation, however, takes the approach of preparing the society for the existing and expected impacts of climate change, from past emissions, which are being experienced by residents across the world (Chambwera et al. 2014...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Alexander LV, Zhang X, Peterson TC et al (2006) Global observed changes in daily climate extremes of temperature and precipitation. J Geophys Res Atmos 111:1–22.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JD006290CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Andrade E, Barrett N, Colon-Ramos U, et al (2018) Ascertainment of the estimated excess mortality from Hurricane María in Puerto Rico. The George Washington University, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  3. Barrios S, Bertinelli L, Strobl E (2006) Climatic change and rural – urban migration: the case of sub-Saharan Africa. J Urban Econ 60:357–371. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USA.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jue.2006.04.005CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Blake E, Kimberlain T, Berg R, et al (2013) National hurricane center tropical cyclone report: hurricane sandyGoogle Scholar
  5. Cangialosi JP, Latto AS, Berg R (2018) National hurricane center tropical cyclone report: hurricane Irma. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USAGoogle Scholar
  6. Cardona O, van Aalst MK, Birkmann J, et al (2012) Determinants of risk: exposure and vulnerability. In: Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation – a special report of working groups I and II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), pp 65–108. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, and New York, NY, USA.Google Scholar
  7. CCSP (2008) Weather and climate extremes in a changing climate. Regions of focus: North America, Hawaii, Caribbean, and U.S. Pacific Islands. In: Karl TR, Meehl GA, Miller CD, Hassol SJ, Waple AM, Murray WL (eds) A report by the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and the Subcommittee on Global Change Research. Department of Commerce, NOAA’s National Climatic Data Center, Washington, DC, 164 ppGoogle Scholar
  8. Chambwera M, Heal G, Dubeux C, et al (2014) Economics of adaptation. In: Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: GLOBAL and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, pp 945–977Google Scholar
  9. Ciscar J, Feyen L, Lavalle C, et al (2014) Climate impacts in Europe: the JRC PESETA II project. Publications Office of the European Union, LuxembourgGoogle Scholar
  10. Commonwealth of Australia (2015) National climate resilience and adaptation strategy. Australian GovernmentGoogle Scholar
  11. Conde C, Lonsdale K (2004) Engaging stakeholders in the adaptation process. In: Lim B, Spanger-Siegfried E, Burton I et al (eds) Adaptation policy frameworks for climate change: developing strategies, policies and measures. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New York, pp 47–66Google Scholar
  12. Cruz AM, Steinberg LJ, Vetere Arellano AL, et al (2004) State of the art in Natech risk management. Publications Office of the European Union, LuxembourgGoogle Scholar
  13. Dawson RJ, Thompson D, Johns D et al (2018) A systems framework for national assessment of climate risks to infrastructure. Philos Trans R Soc A Math Phys Eng Sci 376:20170298.  https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2017.0298CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Department of Environmental Affairs (2017) South Africa’s 2nd annual climate change report 2016. Department of Environmental Affairs, Republic of South AfricaGoogle Scholar
  15. Dowdy AJ, Catto JL (2017) Extreme weather caused by concurrent cyclone, front and thunderstorm occurrences. Sci Rep 7:1–8.  https://doi.org/10.1038/srep40359CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. European Commission (2013) Adapting infrastructure to climate change. European Commission, BrusselsGoogle Scholar
  17. FEMA (2018) Collaborative effort moves Florida hurricane recovery forward six months after Hurricane Irma. https://www.fema.gov/news-release/2018/03/06/collaborative-effort-moves-florida-hurricane-recovery-forward-six-months
  18. Ford JD, Berrang-ford L, Bunce A et al (2015) The status of climate change adaptation in Africa and Asia. Reg Environ Chang 15:801–814.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-014-0648-2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Füssel H-M, Klein RJT (2006) Climate change vulnerability assessments: an evolution of conceptual thinking. Clim Chang 75:301–329CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Hawken P (2017) Drawdown: the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming. Penguin, New York, NY, USAGoogle Scholar
  21. IPCC (2012) Managing the risks of extreme events and disasters to advance climate change adaptation. In: Field CB, Barros V, Stocker TF, Qin D, Dokken DJ, Ebi KL, Mastrandrea MD, Mach KJ, Plattner G-K, Allen SK, Tignor M, Midgley PM (eds) A special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  22. IPCC (2014) Climate change 2014: synthesis report. In: Core Writing Team, Pachauri RK, Meyer LA (eds) Contribution of working groups I, II and III to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. IPCC, Geneva, p 151Google Scholar
  23. Klein RJT, Midgley GF, Preston BL, et al (2014) Adaptation opportunities, constraints, and limits. In: Climate change 2014 impacts, adaptation and vulnerability: part a: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, pp 899–943Google Scholar
  24. Kundzewicz ZW, Radziejewski M, Pinskwar I (2006) Precipitation extremes in the changing climate of Europe. Clim Res 31:51–58CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Melillo J, Richmond T, Yohe G (2014) Climate change impacts in the United States: the third national climate assessment. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington DCCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Mimura N, Pulwarty RS, Duc DM, et al (2014) Adaptation planning and implementation. In: Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, pp 869–898Google Scholar
  27. Ministry of Environment of Brazil (2016) National adaptation plan to climate change volume II: sectoral and thematic strategies. Ministry of Environment, BrazilGoogle Scholar
  28. National Academies (2016) Attribution of extreme weather events in the context of climate change. The National Academies Press, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  29. Niang-Diop I, Bosch H (2004) Formulating an adaptation strategy. In: Lim B, Spanger-Siegfried E, Burton I et al (eds) Adaptation policy frameworks for climate change: developing strategies, policies and measures. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK/New York, pp 183–204Google Scholar
  30. Noble IR, Huq S, Anokhin YA, et al (2014) Adaptation needs and options. In: Climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, pp 833–868Google Scholar
  31. Nurse L, McClean R, Agard J, Briguglio L, Duva V, Pelesikoti N, Tompkins E, Webb A (2014) Small Islands. In: climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part B: regional aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, pp 1613–1654Google Scholar
  32. Palipane E, Lu J, Staten P et al (2017) Investigating the zonal wind response to SST warming using transient ensemble AGCM experiments. Clim Dyn 48:523–540.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00382-016-3092-9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Papalexiou SM, AghaKouchak A, Trenberth KE, Foufoula-Georgiou E (2018) Global, regional, and megacity trends in the highest temperature of the year: diagnostics and evidence for accelerating trends. Earth’s Futur 6:71–79.  https://doi.org/10.1002/eft2.278CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Pasch R, Penny A, Berg R (2018) Tropical cyclone report: Hurricane Maria. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Miami, FL, USAGoogle Scholar
  35. Revi A, Satterthwaite DE, Aragón-Durand F, et al (2014) Urban areas. In: climate change 2014: impacts, adaptation, and vulnerability. Part A: global and sectoral aspects. Contribution of working group II to the fifth assessment report of the intergovernmental panel on climate change, pp 535–612Google Scholar
  36. Rosenzweig C, Solecki WD, Blake R et al (2011) Developing coastal adaptation to climate change in the New York City infrastructure-shed: process, approach, tools, and strategies. Clim Chang 106:93–127CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Seraphin H (2018) Current Issues in Tourism Natural disaster and destination management: the case of the Caribbean and hurricane Irma. Curr Issues Tour 1–8.  https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2017.1422483CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Shuckburgh E, Mitchell D, Stott P (2017) Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria: how natural were these ‘natural disasters’? Weather 72:353–354.  https://doi.org/10.1002/wea.3190CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Stott PA, Stone DA, Allen MR (2004) Human contribution to the European heatwave of 2003. Nature 432:610–614.  https://doi.org/10.1029/2001JB001029CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Terpstra PQ, Carvalho AP, Wilkinson E (2013) The plumbing of adaptation finance: accountability, transparency and accessibility at the local level. World Resources Institute, Washington DCGoogle Scholar
  41. The World Bank (2018) GDP (current US$). Accessed at https://data.worldbank.org
  42. Thiede B, Gray C, Mueller V (2016) Climate variability and inter-provincial migration in South America, 1970–2011. Glob Environ Chang 41:228–240.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2016.10.005CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. UNEP (2017) The adaptation gap report: towards global assessment. United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), NairobiGoogle Scholar
  44. Wade TI, Ndiaye O, Mauclaire M et al (2018) Biodiversity field trials to inform reforestation and natural resource management strategies along the African Great Green Wall in Senegal. New For 49:341–362.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11056-017-9623-3CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Warren FJ, Lemmen D (2014) Canada in a changing climate: sector perspectives on impacts and adaptation. Government of Canada, OttawaGoogle Scholar
  46. WHO (2009) Global health risks: mortality and burden of disease attributable to selected major risks. World Health Organization, GenevaGoogle Scholar
  47. WHO (2014) Quantitative risk assessment of the effects of climate change on selected causes of death, 2030s and 2050s. World Health Organization, GenevaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Project DrawdownSausalitoUSA
  2. 2.Environment TobagoScarboroughTrinidad and Tobago

Section editors and affiliations

  • Heather Jones
    • 1
  1. 1.CESUR, Center for Urban and Regional Systems, Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Instituto Superior TécnicoUniversity of LisbonLisbonPortugal