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Foreign Direct Investment and Decent Work in Sub-Saharan Africa

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Part of the Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals book series (ENUNSDG)

Definitions

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is “a form of international inter-firm co-operation involving a significant equality take in, or effective management control of, foreign enterprises” and “other broader forms of non-equity co-operation involving the supply of tangible and intangible assets by foreign enterprises to domestic firms without foreign control” (de Mello 1997: 4). Decent work refers to a high quality of work, while on the contrary poor working conditions will lead to indecent work (Navajas-Romero et al. 2019). The concept of decent work was officially launched by the International Labour Organization (ILO) in 1999 during the 87th International Labour Conference by the then Director-General to promote “opportunities for women and men to obtain decent and productive work in conditions of freedom, equity, security and human dignity” (ILO 1999: 3). Sub-Saharan Africa refers to the countries of the African continent south of the Sahara desert, with a geographical...

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Acknowledgement

The research was supported in part by Research England 2018–2019 Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) grant “Foreign investment, labour market and employment relations: the challenges of Kenya’s sustainable development”

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Correspondence to Xuebing Cao .

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Cao, X. (2020). Foreign Direct Investment and Decent Work in Sub-Saharan Africa. In: Leal Filho, W., Azul, A., Brandli, L., Lange Salvia, A., Wall, T. (eds) Decent Work and Economic Growth. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71058-7_98-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71058-7_98-1

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