Encyclopedia of Security and Emergency Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Lauren R. Shapiro, Marie-Helen Maras

Critical Infrastructure Protection

  • Ronald L. MartinEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69891-5_290-1

Definitions

In the United States

The term “critical infrastructure” has the meaning provided in section 1016(e) of the USA Patriot Act of 2001 (42 U.S.C. 5195c(e)), namely, systems and assets, whether physical or virtual, so vital to the United States that the incapacity or destruction of such systems and assets would have a debilitating impact on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination of those matters.

Presidential Policy Directive-21 (PPD-21, 2013)

PPD-21 defined critical infrastructure. The final piece of this subject is protection. Protection is “Those capabilities necessary to secure the homeland against acts of terrorism and manmade or natural disasters.” (PPD-8, 2011)

Introduction

As defined above Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) of key infrastructures is essential to maintaining our way of life. The CIP programs must be of the highest priority of a government and its citizenry. The US government organizes the nation’s...

Keywords

Critical Infrastructure Protection, CIP National Infrastructure Protection Plan, NIPP Presidential Policy Directive, PPD Presidential Decision Directive, PDD DHS InfraGard CSS CIIP NIST NCCoE resilience PCCIP SLTT HSPD CISA QHSR Patriot Act NIHS 
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References

  1. Bush. (2003). Homeland Security Presidential Directive 7 (HSPD-7) 7: Critical infrastructure identification, prioritization, and protection. The Executive Office of the president. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-presidential-directive-7
  2. Center for Security Studies, ETH Zurich. (2008–2009). International CIIP handbook. Retrieved from http://www.css.ethz.ch/publications/pdfs/CIIP-HB-08-09.pdf
  3. Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection. (1997). Critical foundations protecting America’s infrastructure, The report of the President’s commission on critical infrastructure protection. Retrieved from https://fas.org/sgp/library/pccip.pdf
  4. Critical Infrastructures Protection Act of 2001, 42 U.S. Code § 5195c. Critical infrastructures protection, Section was enacted as the Critical Infrastructures Protection Act of 2001 and also as part of the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 or USA PATRIOT Act. https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/42/5195c
  5. Cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency (2018). Critical Infrastructure Sectors. U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/critical-infrastructure-sectors
  6. Department of Homeland Security. (2003). Homeland security Presidential directive 7: Critical infrastructure identification, prioritization, and protection. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-presidential-directive-7
  7. Department of Homeland Security. (2006). National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP). Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://fas.org/irp/agency/dhs/nipp.pdf
  8. Department of Homeland Security. (2009). National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) Partnering to enhance protection and resiliency. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/NIPP_Plan.pdf
  9. Department of Homeland Security. (2013). National Infrastructure Protection Plan: Partnering for critical infrastructure protection and resilience. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/national-infrastructure-protection-plan-2013-508.pdf
  10. Department of Homeland Security. (2018). Cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency, Critical Infrastructure Sectors. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/cisa/critical-infrastructure-sectors
  11. Department of Homeland Security – Fiscal year 2010 Annual financial report. (n.d.). Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/cfo-afrfy2010-vol1.pdf
  12. Gharehyakheh, A., Tolk, J., Fritts, S., & Cantu, J. (2017). A survey paper of protecting critical infrastructure: Applying high reliability theory to advance organizational resilience. IIE Annual Conference. Proceedings, 1968.Google Scholar
  13. Moteff, J. (2012). Critical infrastructures: background, policy, and implementation, issues for congress (CRS R42683) Congressional Research Service, (CRS). Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/R42683.pdf
  14. Moteff, J. (2015). Critical infrastructures: background, policy, and implementation, (CRS RL30153) Congressional Research Service (CRS). Washington, DC: Retrieved from https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RL30153.pdf
  15. National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. (2018). Accelerating the deployment and use of secure, standards-based technologies, brochure National Institute of Standards and Technology. Gaithersburg, MD. Retrieved from https://www.nccoe.nist.gov/sites/default/files/library/nccoe-brochure.pdf
  16. National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. (2019a March). Strategy. Retrieved from https://www.nccoe.nist.gov/about-the-center/strategy
  17. National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence. (2019b March). Projects: Use cases. Retrieved from https://www.nccoe.nist.gov/projects/use-cases
  18. Office of the Press Secretary. (1998). Critical Infrastructure Protection presidential decision directive/NSC-63 (PDD-63). The White House. Washington, DC. Retrieved on March 24, 2019, from https://fas.org/irp/offdocs/pdd/pdd-63.pdf
  19. Office of the Private Sector. (2018). Office of the Private Sector (OPS) Fact sheet. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.fbi.gov/file-repository/ops-factsheet-8-3-18.pdf/view
  20. Office of the Secretary. (2010). Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR). U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Washington, DC. Retrieved from https://www.dhs.gov/sites/default/files/publications/2010-qhsr-report.pdf

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Capital Technology UniversityLaurelUSA