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Pro-Poor Development Strategies

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No Poverty

Part of the book series: Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals ((ENUNSDG))

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Definitions: Pro-Poor Growth and Development

Pro-poor development, in simple terms, refers to a development process that focuses or leads to a significant reduction in the incidence of poverty in a given country or region (Kakwani and Pernia 2000; Ravallion 2004). The term encapsulates two main international development concerns that emerged in the 1990s: first, the need for sustained economic growth in developing countries – to narrow the developmental gap between the low-income and the advanced countries – and second, the global call for poverty alleviation, which became prominent in the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The “pro-poor” concept represents a shift from the earlier notion of “trickle-down” development – which assumes an automatic diffusion of the benefits of economic growth to all segments of the society. The proponents of pro-poor development contend that economic growth – although, an essential element for poverty alleviation – does not always correspond to poverty...

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Correspondence to George Asiamah .

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Asiamah, G. (2020). Pro-Poor Development Strategies. In: Leal Filho, W., Azul, A., Brandli, L., Lange Salvia, A., Özuyar, P., Wall, T. (eds) No Poverty. Encyclopedia of the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69625-6_9-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69625-6_9-1

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