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Buddhist Perspectives on Personal Fulfillment and Workplace Flourishing

  • Satinder Dhiman
Reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter examines the Buddhist perspectives on personal fulfillment and workplace harmony. Buddhism is an art of living based on the science of mind (Yeshe 2008). First, the chapter will present an overview of the Buddha’s life and his essential teachings based on the Pāli canon, which preeminent scholars such as Carrithers (1988), Bodhi (2005, 2012, 2016, 2017); Rahula (1974), Nanamoli (1992/2001), Narada (2008), Nhat Hanh and Vriezen (2008), Nyanaponika (1962/1996), Nyanatiloka (2000), and Thanissaro (2004) consider the foundation for all existing streams of Buddhist teaching and practice through the centuries. It will provide an overview of the central teachings of Theravada Buddhism (the doctrine of the elders) on such key topics as the Four Noble Truths, the Eightfold Path, the Three Empirical Marks of Existence (suffering, impermanence, and not-self), and the principle of Dependent Origination.

After presenting its origin and essential teachings, the chapter will briefly review Buddhist philosophy and psychology and its contribution in the quest for happiness and fulfillment at the individual and organizational level. The chapter will conclude with essential pointers and practices based on Buddhist psychology that contribute to individual and organizational well-being and fulfillment, incorporating views from nine in-depth, structured interviews conducted by the author.

Keywords

Theravada Buddhism Buddhist psychology Personal happiness and fulfillment Workplace wellness and flourishing 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of BusinessWoodbury UniversityBurbankUSA

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