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Distance Perception

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Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

Synonyms

Depth perception

Definition

Distance perception refers to a process in which an observer perceives an interval between two points in space. The interval does not have to be linear, but perception of a straight-line distance has been most extensively studied. The distance can be defined between the observer and an external object (egocentric distance) or between two external objects (exocentric distance), and perception of these two types of distance tends to show different characteristics (e.g., Loomis et al. 1992). Distance perception and depth perception are often considered synonymous. However, they can also be subtly distinguished such that depth perception specifically refers to perception of exocentric distance along the observer’s line of sight. Although this entry is focused on visual distance perception, distance can be perceived through multiple senses, such as audition (Kolarik et al. 2016), haptics (Lederman and Klatzky 2009), and vestibular sense and...

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Correspondence to Naohide Yamamoto .

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Yamamoto, N. (2017). Distance Perception. In: Kreutzer, J., DeLuca, J., Caplan, B. (eds) Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56782-2_9103-2

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