Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

Living Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Cogniform Disorder

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56782-2_2086-2

Synonyms

Definition

In neuropsychology, the assessment of test-taking effort has captured the focus of considerable research and debate. In the past 20 years, over 500 studies have been published in peer-reviewed neuropsychological journals that address the breadth and scope of this problem (see reviews by Hom and Denney 2002; Iverson and Binder 2000; Larrabee 2005; Sweet 1999). Considerable advances have been made in the development of empirically based methods for identifying individuals who are simulating cognitive problems, including the use of instruments designed specifically to assess cognitive validity (Binder 1993; Frederick 1997; Green et al. 2001; Tombaugh 1996), analysis of atypical performances on standard ability tests (Larrabee 2003; Millis et al. 1995), and analysis of test-retest profile inconsistencies (Hom and Denney 2002; Iverson and Binder 2000). In addition, specific guidelines and criteria have been...

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References and Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego Veterans Affairs Healthcare SystemUniversity of CaliforniaLa JollaUSA