Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

Living Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-56782-2_1062-2

Synonyms

Description

The Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test-second edition (K-BIT-2; Kaufman and Kaufman 2004) is a brief intelligence test designed as a screening measure for verbal and nonverbal abilities for individuals 4–90 years of age. The K-BIT-2 contains three subtests: Verbal Knowledge, Matrices, and Riddles. The Verbal Knowledge subtest consists of items for which the examiner says a word or asks a question and the participant responds by pointing to the picture that best answers the question; the Matrices subtest requires the participant to analyze a series of pictures/patterns and point to the response that corresponds with that picture/pattern; and for the Riddles subtest, the examiner says a verbal riddle and the participant responds by pointing to a picture or saying a word that answers the riddle. The Verbal Knowledge and Riddles subtests comprise the Verbal Standard Score, while Matrices makes up the Nonverbal Standard Score. Administration time is approximately...

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Physical Medicine and RehabilitationUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA