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Guiding Questions for Game-Based Learning

  • Karen Schrier
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

The primary goal of this chapter is to identify the main questions and tensions for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers to navigate when considering why, how, when, who and whether to use and design games for learning. The chapter reviews elements related to using games for learning, such as motivation, problem-solving, and story, as well as guiding questions such as “what are the goals?” and “who is the audience?” Finally, future trends in games and learning are considered.

Keywords

Games Game design Educational games Game-based learning Serious games Digital games 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Marist CollegeDutchess County, PoughkeepsieUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • David Gibson
    • 1
  • Hiroaki Ogata
    • 2
  1. 1.Curtin UniversityPerthAustralia
  2. 2.Kyushu UniversityFukuokaJapan

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