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Leading Information Technology via Design Thinking

  • John B. Nash
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

Design thinking is a solution-finding process that offers a user-centric approach to find new, previously nonexistent solutions to persistent challenges people face in the adoption and implementation of IT. This chapter explains what design thinking is, why it would be of use to leaders of IT, and how to put it into practice in the leadership of IT.

Keywords

Design thinking Human centered design IT Instructional technology School technology leadership Leadership Schools Schooling Principals Leadership 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sara Dexter
    • 1
  1. 1.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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