American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC)

  • Claudia Chemello
  • Susanne Rawson
  • Molly Gleeson
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2430-2

Basic Information

The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC; http://www.conservation-us.org) is the national membership organization supporting conservation professionals in preserving cultural heritage by:
  • Establishing and upholding professional standards

  • Promoting research and publications

  • Providing educational opportunities

  • Fostering the exchange of knowledge among conservators, allied professionals, and the public

Incorporated as a nonprofit organization under article 501(c)(6) of the US tax code in 1972, its membership of over 3400 includes archaeological conservators who are active around the world.

AIC holds annual meetings in venues across the United States. General session themes range from the theoretical to the practical, while specialty group sessions focus on topics of particular interest to those practicing in fields ranging from architecture, books and paper, electronic media, paintings, photographic materials, textiles, and objects,...

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References

  1. Conservation Online. Available at http://cool.conservation-us.org/
  2. Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. 1962–current. Available at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/yjac20. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.

Further Reading

  1. American Institute for Conservation Archaeological Conservation Brochure. 2012. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/docs/default-source/resource-guides/aic-adg-brochure-2012-web. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  2. American Institute for Conservation Archaeological Fieldwork Checklist. 2011. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/docs/default-source/resource-guides/adg-checklist. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  3. American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works website. n.d. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  4. Brady, C., M. Gleeson, M. Myers, C. Peachey, B. Seifert, H. Wellman, E. Williams, and L. Young. 2006. Conservation FAQ’s and facts. Available at https://sha.org/conservation-facts/. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  5. Caring for your treasures. n.d. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/about-conservation/caring-for-your-treasures. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  6. Conservation training in the US. n.d. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/jobs/become-a-conservator. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  7. Conservation Wiki. n.d. Available at http://www.conservation-wiki.com/. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  8. Find a conservator. n.d. Available at http:www.conservation-us.org/findaconservator. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  9. Heritage Emergency Programs. n.d. Available at http://www.conservation-us.org/emergencies. Accessed 1 Sept 2017.
  10. Warda, J., ed. 2017. The AIC guide to digital photography and conservation documentation. 3rd ed. American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia Chemello
    • 1
  • Susanne Rawson
    • 2
  • Molly Gleeson
    • 3
  1. 1.Terra Mare Conservation LLCCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.School of Art History, Classics and Religious StudiesVictoria University WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  3. 3.American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC)WashingtonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Richard McClary ‎
  • Douglas C. Comer
    • 1
  1. 1.ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM)Cultural Site Research and Management, Inc. (CSRM)BaltimoreUSA