Survey Archaeology in the Roman World

  • Alessandro Launaro
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_1480-2

Introduction

A considerable feature of Roman civilization was the creation and support of a dense network of urban settlements. In this respect, the case of Italy is even more remarkable if one considers that – besides the presence of a megalopolis like Rome (with its one million inhabitants) – there existed about 430 urban centers scattered all over the peninsula. The thousands of cities and towns of the Roman Empire were connected and supplied by a much-celebrated and highly effective infrastructure made up of ports, roads, and aqueducts. More crucially, each urban polity possessed a well-defined territory (ager): it was (in part) laid out as a regular grid network of squared cadastral plots (centuriatio), and it was specifically meant to provide the inhabitants with most of the resources they needed (e.g., foodstuffs, raw materials). Preindustrial urban populations always required a comparatively higher rural counterpart to support them, and in this regard, the highly urbanized...

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References

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Further Reading

  1. Alcock, S.E. 1993. Graecia Capta: The landscapes of Roman Greece. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
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  3. Barker, G., and D.J. Mattingly, eds. 1999–2000. The archaeology of Mediterranean landscapes. 5 vols. Oxford: Oxbow.Google Scholar
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  6. Keller, D.J., and D.W. Rupp, eds. Archaeological survey in the Mediterranean area, British archaeological reports international series. Vol. 155. Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.Google Scholar
  7. Mattingly, D.J. 2009. Peopling ancient landscapes: Potential and problems. In Quantifying the Roman economy: Methods and problems, ed. A. Bowman and A. Wilson, 163–174. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Millett, M. 2010. Town and country in the early Roman West – A perspective. In Changing landscapes. The impact of Roman Towns in Western Mediterranean, ed. C. Corsi and F. Vermeulen, 17–25. Bologna: Ante Quem.Google Scholar
  9. Terrenato, N. 2012. The essential countryside: The Roman world. In Classical archaeology, ed. S.E. Alcock and R. Osborne, 2nd ed., 144–167. Oxford: Blackwell.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of ClassicsUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Jeffrey A. Becker
    • 1
  • Alison Barclay
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Classical and Near Eastern StudiesBinghamton University - SUNYBinghamtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Modern Languages and ClassicsSaint Mary's UniversityHalifaxCanada