Community Colleges and Global Counterparts: Defining a Higher Educational Sector

Reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

Within higher education exists a sector of institutions called Community Colleges and Global Counterparts. These institutions are Global Counterparts to one another because they share mission, structural, and philosophical characteristics as they “educate non-traditional post-secondary students and demonstrate in a practical way the means by which new generations can receive skills and training that will ensure employment, prosperity and facilitation of social mobility” (Raby and Valeau. Community college models: Globalization and higher education reform. Dordrecht: Springer, 2009). Although researchers world-wide have examined this sector since 1971, it remains largely understudied and under-recognized by world educators and policy makers. This chapter examines how the mission of these institutions’ intends to provide an opportunity to build social mobility and yet simultaneously serves as a limitation that maintains societal inequalities. The chapter also applies the theory of educational borrowing to explore what institutional characteristics emerged as a result of internal institutional change and what characteristics emerged as a result of globalization patterns. In an era of expanded educational reform for higher education, the role of the Community College or Global Counterpart is pivotal for serving a varied workforce that is ever demanding and changing.

Keywords

Community Colleges and Global Counterparts sector Non-traditional post-secondary students Social mobility Societal inequalities Educational borrowing Globalization 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Department, Michael E. Eisner College of EducationCalifornia State UniversityNorthridgeUSA
  2. 2.California Colleges for International EducationChatsworthUSA
  3. 3.University of Phoenix, Southern California CampusCosta MesaUSA
  4. 4.Hartnell Community College DistrictSalinasUSA
  5. 5.The ELS GroupMontereyUSA

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