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Developing a Skilled Workforce Through Technical and Vocational Education and Training in the Philippines

  • Kiran S. Budhrani
  • Marc M. D’Amico
  • Jose Lloyd D. Espiritu
Reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

One of the major development challenges for the Philippines is to prepare the youth (ages 15–24) for the workforce. The country is still facing low education, high dropouts, and unemployment, particularly among the youth. Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) is the postsecondary education sector, providing noncredit, technical middle-level skills training to produce skilled workers. The Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA) provides national leadership for the TVET system by implementing competency-based curriculum standards, training regulations, and assessment and certification processes to ensure a high-quality TVET delivery throughout the country. With the country’s recent shift to K-12 compulsory education, TVET education is integrated into senior high school to produce high school graduates with employable skills. Those who do not choose to enter higher education after high school often choose TVET to earn a National Certificate (NC) from TESDA. NCs are well recognized as nationwide employment credentials and are often required during the recruitment of skilled workers locally and abroad, but are not applied or transferrable to higher education. The most prevalent connection seen between TVET in the Philippines and US Community Colleges is through noncredit education. One of the primary differences is TVET’s exclusive focus on workforce development programs leading to government-based certifications or credentials. While the majority of noncredit education in US Community Colleges is for workforce training, it is not the only focus, and the function allows colleges to use this flexible delivery method to meet a variety of community needs. While the conditions and educational configurations may differ between the Philippines and the United States, the strong connection made between education and employment is both undeniable and a national priority in each country.

Keywords

TVET Technical Vocational Training workforce Technical education Noncredit Community college Philippines United States TESDA Technical education and skills development authority Competency-based education Post-secondary Education Policy Job-skills mismatch K-12 Senior high school Employment 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kiran S. Budhrani
    • 1
  • Marc M. D’Amico
    • 2
  • Jose Lloyd D. Espiritu
    • 3
  1. 1.Center for Teaching and LearningUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Educational LeadershipUniversity of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  3. 3.Psychology DepartmentDe La Salle UniversityManilaPhilippines

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