Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Beach Nourishment

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_35-2

Introduction

Beaches occur where there is sufficient sediment for wave deposition above water level along lakes, open ocean coasts, embayments, and estuaries. Beach nourishment most commonly takes place along marine beaches, which are among the most dynamic environments on earth. On a global scale, estimates of marine sandy beaches (see entry on Sandy Coasts) range from about 34% (170,000 km) (Hardisty 1990) to 40% of the world’s coastline (Bird 1996). Beaches form essentially 100% of the coast of The Netherlands, 60% in Australia, and 33% in the United States (Short 1999). Comprising a significant proportion of the world’s coastline, beaches are important considerations for coastal recreation and storm protection, while others are used for residential, commercial, and industrial purposes. Although they serve as natural barriers to storm surge ( q.v.) and waves ( q.v.), today about 75% of the world’s beaches are subject to erosion (Bird 1985). In the United States, the percentage of...
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Coastal Education and Research Foundation (CERF)AshevilleUSA
  2. 2.Journal of Coastal Research (JCR)Coconut CreekUSA
  3. 3.Department of GeosciencesFlorida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Geography & AnthropologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA