Encyclopedia of Geochemistry

2018 Edition
| Editors: William M. White

Beryllium

  • Jeffrey G. RyanEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-39312-4_80

Element Data

Atomic Symbol: Be

Atomic Number: 4.

Atomic Weight: 9.01218.

Stable Isotope: 9Be (9.0121822 amu): 100%; Relevant Radioisotopes: 10Be (t1/2 ≈ 1.38 Ma), 7Be (t1/2 ≈ 53.28 days)

1 Atm Melting Point: 1287 °C

1 Atm Boiling Point: 2471 °C

Valence: +2.

Ionic Radius: 0.41 Å (tetrahedral); 0.59 Å (octahedral)

Pauling Electronegativity: 1.57

First Ionization Potential: 9.322

CI Chondritic Abundance: 0.025 ppm

Continental Crust: 1.9 ppm

Silicate Earth: 0.07 ppm

Seawater: 0.0018 pg/g

Core Abundance: ~0

(Earthref.org 2016; McDonough 2004; Palme et al. 2014)

Properties

Beryllium, the lowest atomic number alkaline earth element, is a steel-gray, brittle, lightweight metal. It is most commonly encountered in a small number of silicate and oxide minerals and occurs as a low abundance, lithophile trace element in most geologic systems.

History and Use

Beryllium was discovered by Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin in 1798 in the oxide form via extraction from emerald and beryl. In 1828, Friedrich Wohler...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of GeosciencesUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA