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Perceptions and Attitudes of Pupils Toward Technology

  • Piet Ankiewicz
Living reference work entry
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE)

Abstract

Students’ technological concepts and attitudes have been researched for just over three decades. The chapter addresses several viewpoints concerning the construct of attitudes toward technology, such as definitions of attitude, and fundamental reasons for measuring students’ attitudes. The main part of the chapter presents the Pupils’ Attitudes Toward Technology-Netherlands (PATT-NL) instrument and the PATT-USA instrument associated with the classical PATT studies, as well as the PATT Short Questionnaire (PATT-SQ) as a recent adaptation of PATT-USA. It also focuses on new instruments, such as the Attitudinal Technology Profile (ATP) questionnaire that were developed based on regional and contextual factors. The latter part of the chapter provides general research findings from the PATT studies on students’ attitudes toward technology, as well as examples of recent multidimensional versus unidimensional studies.

Keywords

Technology education Attitudes Concepts Behavior Attitude measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgment

I would like to express my sincere gratitude toward my former colleague and Master’s student, Dr. Susan van Rensburg, and colleague, Prof Chris Myburgh all working together enthusiastically and committedly on this theme toward the end of the previous century. Also to my research assistant, Ben Low who assisted me in collating and meticulously organizing the applicable sources over a short period.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Science and Technology EducationUniversity of JohannesburgAuckland ParkSouth Africa

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