Foreign Policy in Latin America

  • Sébastien Dubé
  • Shirley Gotz
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-31816-5_2683-1

Synonyms

Introduction

Latin American foreign policies are public policies implemented by the political leaders of the countries of the region in order to reach higher levels of development and security through cooperation with the international system. Their analysis, therefore, has to combine a high number of elements ranging from world politics, patterns and trends of the global economy, national political systems, leaders’ worldviews, and strategies of development to the nature of the threats to the states or their population.

A comprehensive overview of the literature leads to claim that the analysis of Latin American foreign policies, by both practitioners and students, has to consider the impact of the following five “I factors”: the international system; the institutions; the individuals; the shared Latin American identity; and the countries’ interests....

Keywords

Foreign Policy Latin American Country Dependency Theory Veto Player Soft Power 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Universidad de Santiago de ChileSantiagoChile
  2. 2.Universidad Alberto HurtadoSantiagoChile