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Hip Dislocation with Acetabular Fracture

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Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Case Atlas

Abstract

Traumatic dislocation of the hip is a rare injury in the pediatric and adolescent population. Management of this injury revolves around obtaining a stable and concentric reduction of the hip joint. This can typically be accomplished via closed means with reduction in either the emergency department or the operating room. If an attempt at closed reduction is unsuccessful, or results in a noncongruent hip joint, then surgical intervention is warranted. Recent studies have shown a high incidence of concomitant posterior labral pathology that may require surgical treatment. Associated injuries can include femoral head fractures, acetabular fractures, femoral head or acetabular cartilage delamination, and labral detachments. This case presents the management strategy for a 14-year-old male with a right hip dislocation and associated osteochondral avulsion of the posterior labrum.

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References and Suggested Reading

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Correspondence to John B. Erickson .

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Erickson, J.B., Klingele, K.E. (2020). Hip Dislocation with Acetabular Fracture. In: Iobst, C., Frick, S. (eds) Pediatric Orthopedic Trauma Case Atlas. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29980-8_85

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-29980-8_85

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  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-319-29979-2

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-319-29980-8

  • eBook Packages: MedicineReference Module Medicine

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