Encyclopedia of Pathology

Living Edition
| Editors: J.H.J.M. van Krieken

Pulse Granuloma

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28845-1_770-1

Synonyms

Definition

Pulse granuloma is an unusual oral giant cell granulomatous lesion affecting either the jaws or the posterior mandibular ridge in particular. Initially, the lesion was described as “chronic periostitis” characterized by the presence of rings of eosinophilic structureless material (hyaline rings) with numerous multinucleated giant cells and areas of fibrosis, macrophages, plasma cells, and lymphocytes as in common granulomas. The origin of these hyaline rings has been controversial. Dunlap and Barker (1977) suggested that the structures were a result of degenerative changes in the wall of blood vessels, where others considered that the lesion was a result of the impression and incorporation of food particles, especially legumes or vegetable materials (pulse), within and through the mucous membrane and submucosal tissue and periosteum, resulting in a...

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References and Further Reading

  1. Dunlap, C. L., & Barker, B. F. (1977). Giant cell hyaline angiopathy. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology, 44, 587–591.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Lewars, P. H. D. (1971). Chronic periostitis in the mandible underneath artificial dentures. British Journal of Oral Surgery, 8, 264–269.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. McMillan, M. D., Kardos, T. B., Edwards, J. L., Thorburn, D. N., Adams, D. B., & Palmer, D. K. (1981). Giant cell hyaline angiopathy or pulse granuloma. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, and Oral Pathology, 52, 178–186.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Philipsen, H. P., & Reichart, P. A. (2010). Pulse or hyaline ring granuloma. Review of the literature on etiopathogenesis of oral and extraoral lesions. Clinical Oral Investigations, 14, 121–128.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Talacko, A. A., & Radden, B. G. (1988). Oral pulse granuloma: Clinical and histopathological features. A review of 62 cases. International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 17, 343–346.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Virkkunen, S., et al. (2017). Positive staining for cellulose in oral pulse granuloma. Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, 123, 464467.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyThe National Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek HospitalAmsterdamThe Netherlands