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Emotional Intensity

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Synonyms

Affect intensity; Strength of emotional experiences

Definition

Emotional intensity refers to variations in the magnitude of emotional responses.

Introduction

Research on emotional intensity started receiving more attention when Frijda et al. (1992) expressed their concerns about a lack of research on this topic. They argued that, although people often express their emotional experiences in terms of intensity, no systematic investigation had been done on how emotional intensity should be defined, operationalized, and measured. This state of affairs resulted in the proposal of a number of prominent theories of emotional intensity during the 1990s. However, despite the relevance of these proposals, not much effort has been made to articulate them into an integrated model. Furthermore, interest in empirical research focusing explicitly on emotional intensity appears to have decreased after 2000s. Nevertheless, interesting developments involving research using neuroimaging...

Keywords

  • Skin Conductance
  • Skin Conductance Response
  • Emotional Category
  • Late Positive Potential
  • Emotional Intensity

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Nobuhiko Goto .

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Goto, N., Schaefer, A. (2017). Emotional Intensity. In: Zeigler-Hill, V., Shackelford, T. (eds) Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_509-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_509-1

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