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Freudian Dream Interpretation

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Definition

The psychoanalyst’s and the dreaming person’s cooperative work of interpreting the dream leads to wishes and to infantile sources of dream-construction. During the dream, the transformational and disguising “dream-work” takes place. In order to decipher the dream, it is necessary to link the report of the dream (the “manifest dream”) to its hallucinatory wish-fulfillment (the “latent content of the dream”).

Introduction

The dream updates and elaborates memories containing impressions of the recent past, so-called day residues, and links them to unconscious wishes, fears, and defense strategies, which can be traced back to early childhood. During sleep, memory traces are reorganized with respect to wish-fulfillment. The dream is constructed akin to a hallucinatory series of visual, auditory, and – more rarely – other kinds of sensory impressions. The hallucinatory nature of the dream is the result of a retrogressive course, which transforms mental processes into sensory...

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Boothe, B. (2017). Freudian Dream Interpretation. In: Zeigler-Hill, V., Shackelford, T. (eds) Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1379-1

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