The Eastern Arctic Seas Encyclopedia

2016 Edition
| Editors: Igor S. Zonn, Andrey G. Kostianoy, Aleksandr V. Semenov

Plenisner, Fedor (Friedrich) Khristianovich (?–1778)

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24237-8_400

Plenisner, Fedor (Friedrich) Khristianovich (?–1778) – a Russian traveler, colonel, member of the Second Kamchatka (Great Northern) Expedition, and a researcher of the Northeast Asia. He was born in Courland. From 1730 to 1735, he served in the Life Guards Cavalry in the rank of corporal. In 1737, he was sent to the port of Okhotsk, where in 1738 he was appointed as a subofficer to the expedition of Vitus Bering (taken as a “painter”). In 1741 at the packet boat “St. Peter,” P. sailed to the northwest coast of America and spent the winter on Bering Island. Then he came to the conclusion that many thousands of years ago, a great isthmus connected the old and new continents. P. assumption was supported by many Russian scientists and travelers. In 1742 he returned to Kamchatka. During the expedition, he made sketches of the coast from Okhotsk to Petropavlovsk and the Gulf of Alaska and portrayed marine animals and fish. In 1742–1753, P. served in St. Petersburg. In 1753, he became a major in the Anadyr fortress. In 1761, at the request of the Siberian Governor F. I. Soymonov, P. was promoted to lieutenant colonel and appointed chief commander of the Anadyr fortress (1761–1763). He organized the collection of information about the “Great Land” to the northwest and east of the Chukotka Peninsula. For this purpose, in 1763–1765, he sent N. I. Daurkin to the Medvezhiy and S. Andreeva Islands in the Bering Strait and arranged the timely formation and dispatch of the expedition of I. B. Sindt for studying and surveying the northeastern coast of Asia and northwest coast of America (1764–1768). He collected information about the islands in the Arctic and Pacific Oceans and together with T. I. Shmalev in 1763 prepared a geographical description of the Anadyr River. In 1764, P. submitted F. I. Soymonov a detailed historical overview of the Anadyr Region. Later, he commanded the Port of Okhotsk (1764–1772). In 1776, he moved to St. Petersburg. In 1777, P. handed over to the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences the “Map of the Chukchi Nose,” a geographical description of the Anadyr River, and the “Notes to the Map on the Shores Between Asia and America.”

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