Encyclopedia of Business and Professional Ethics

Living Edition
| Editors: Deborah C Poff, Alex C. Michalos

Balanced Scorecard

  • Ogan YigitbasiogluEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-23514-1_212-1

Synonyms

Introduction

The balanced scorecard (Kaplan and Norton 1992) is a strategic management tool and a specific type of scorecard that views an organization from four perspectives or dimensions: (i) learning and growth, (ii) internal business processes, (iii) customers, and (iv) finance. Performance scorecards like the balanced scorecard have long existed in management (e.g., see Tableau de Bord conceived in the early part of the twentieth century in France) and provide a framework for developing performance metrics to collect and analyze data on an organization. The balanced scorecard has been widely adopted to support with the planning, running, and management of an organization. Managers use the balanced scorecard for three purposes: (i) decision-making and decision-rationalizing, (ii) coordination, and (iii) self-monitoring (Wiersma 2009). The balanced scorecard supports decision-making as managers can draw on the balanced scorecard...

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References

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Additional Readings

  1. Kaplan RS, Norton DP (1992) The balanced scorecard: measures that drive performance. Harv Bus Rev 83(7):172Google Scholar
  2. Kaplan RS, Norton DP (1996) The balanced scorecard: translating strategy into action. Harvard Business School PressGoogle Scholar
  3. Kaplan RS, Norton DP (2004) Strategy maps: converting intangible assets into tangible outcomes. Harvard Business PressGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of AccountancyQUT Business SchoolBrisbaneAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Andrew West
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Accountancy, QUT Business SchoolQueensland University of TechnologyBrisbane CityAustralia