Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford

Sexual Access as Benefit of Victory in War

  • Chet R. SavageEmail author
  • Craig T. PalmerEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_965-1

Synonyms

Definition

Warfare, defined as lethal coalitional violence, is a human universal and may be partially explained as a result of evolved psychological mechanisms in males for increased sexual access to females.

Introduction

J. M. G. van der Dennen described how, at the Fifth Annual Meeting of the Human Behavior and Evolution Society (1993), Leda Cosmides posed the question “Why would anyone be so stupid as to initiate a war?” and then provided the answer: “To get women” (quoted in van der Dennen 1995, p. 327). Although this answer is often rejected out of hand by most social scientists, and modern scholars of war rarely consider sexual access as a motive for warfare, the notion that coalitional violence is waged by men to gain sexual access to women is far from new. Descriptions of success in war leading to increased sexual access to women are found in both ancient texts and...

Keywords

Moral Judgment Ethical Judgment Female Choice Evolutionary Explanation Genetic Determinism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Independent ScholarPost FallsUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA